DARRYL JENIFER REVEALS THE MYSTERY BEHIND HR’S CHAIR
October 21st, 2014 by Larry

Bad Brains bassist Darryl Jenifer reveals an unheard tale of punk insanity… as soon as he gets through the intro.

NYHC 1980 – 1990 – THE RAW CUTS – JOHN PORCELLY
October 8th, 2014 by Tony

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‘NYHC was definitely on everybody’s radar by the time we made it outside of the area in 1986. It was considered dangerous. People thought we were all nuts. The very first time Youth of Today went out to California with 7 Seconds, we played at Fender’s Ballroom, which was a gang hangout. The whole California hardcore scene was all gangs: Circle One, the Suicidals, the L.A. Death Squad, and that was it—nothing but gangs. I didn’t know anything. That was my first time in California. I was used to playing the Anthrax in Connecticut, where people were playing frickin’ Twister in between bands! When we started playing, this small, little kid Murphy was on stage with us, and the L.A.D.S. were bouncing. They were a gang, above and beyond the punk scene. I didn’t know that. Murphy got onstage to dive, the bouncer grabbed him, and, for no good reason, threw him right into the metal barrier. He was right in front of the stage sort of flexing after doing that, and I came up behind him and kicked him as hard as I could in the back. He went flying into the crowd. Dan O’Mahony from No For An Answer came up a few seconds later and screamed in my ear, “We have to get you out of here!” I was still playing, and he dragged me off the stage. He unplugs my guitar, grabs my arm, and he’s pushing me down this corridor, going, “You don’t understand! That guy’s in the L.A.D.S.! They’re going to fucking kill you! They’re going to shoot you! They’re going to knife you!” I still had my guitar on me. Before we got to the back door, I looked down that corridor and saw that bouncer. I’m thinking, “This guy’s going to shoot me, I’m fucking dead!” The guy was huge. But he came up to me and said, “We don’t have no beef with New York! We don’t have no beef with the Cro-Mags!” It was almost like he thought I was in a gang, and I was going to kick his ass! He gave me all this mad respect. He shook my hand and apologized. I realized that New York’s reputation preceded us.’ – John Porcelly

Remember to pre-order your copy of ‘NYHC 1980 – 1990′ from Bazillion Points to get an exclusive Sean Taggart embroidered patch and badge!

BIG BOYS DOCUMENTARY – TEASER TRAILER
October 3rd, 2014 by Larry

The Big Boys were a pioneering band who are credited with helping introduce the new style of hardcore punk that became popular in the 1980s. This is the teaser for their upcoming documentary.

SALAD DAYS – TRAILER
September 30th, 2014 by Larry

Look for the film in December, but you can check out portions from the doc at a special Salad Days event during the CBGBs Festival in NYC. Scheduled for October 11 at 10:30PM, Noisey EIC Fred Pessaro will host a Q&A with Director/Writer Scott Crawford and producer/editor Jim Saah at Anthology Film Archives (32 2nd Ave, NYC). Tickets are on sale.

The DC Premiere of the film will take place in late December, and feature a post premiere party at the Black Cat on Dec 20 featuring Soulside (first time together in 25 years), Moss Icon, and others! Tickets go on sale Friday (10/3).

CIV – FULL SET FROM THIS IS HARDCORE 2014
September 24th, 2014 by Larry

CIV
July 26, 2014
The Electric Factory
Philadelphia, PA

Additional camerawork by Steven Cergizan
Mixed and Mastered by Len Carmichael in Ewing, NJ

10 QUESTIONS WITH GAVIN VAN VLACK
September 19th, 2014 by Larry

10 Questions with guitarist, Gavin Van Vlack.

CHAIN AT THE PHANTASY IN CLEVELAND
September 19th, 2014 by Ed
CHAIN OF STRENGTH AT THE PHANTASY CONCERT CLUB, CLEVELAND, OH | PHOTO: ELIZABETH RANDOL

CHAIN OF STRENGTH AT THE PHANTASY CONCERT CLUB, CLEVELAND, OH | PHOTO: ELIZABETH RANDOL

NYHC 1980 – 1990 – THE RAW INTERVIEWS – TIM CHUNKS
September 18th, 2014 by Tony
TIM CHUNKS OF TOKEN ENTRY  PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

TIM CHUNKS OF TOKEN ENTRY PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

As you might remember, yesterday we announced that my book, ‘NYHC 1980 – 1990′ is now available for pre-order via the publishers’ website.

Up until the official release in early December, we will be running some of the raw, uncut interviews that I conducted for the book. At last count, I had completed a little over one hundred interviews. So, there is a wellspring of these interviews to satisfy your NYHC nerd needs.

First up, we have an interview with Token Entry vocalist, Tim Chunks.

I ended up interviewing Tim twice and both times he was beyond enthusiastic to talk NYHC. So enthusiastic in fact that he almost totally forgot to talk about his own band! His memory is amazing and his insights on the ’85 to ’90 era of the scene are matchless. Much like others who sprang from the NYHC scene into bigger and better things, Tim is a guy who looks back on those days with both fondness and amazement; a perfect combo.

Let’s dig in… — Tony

TOKEN ENTRY AT CITY GARDENS | PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

TOKEN ENTRY AT CITY GARDENS | PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

I have seven brothers and sisters and one of them was having a Halloween party. I was probably around eleven or twelve. Two guys came to the Halloween party dressed as punks; that was their costume. I asked one of my brothers, ‘What are these guys supposed to be?’ and he was like ‘They’re punk rockers. You’ve never heard of punk rock?’ The funny thing was the guys who showed up dressed as punk rockers were actual punk rockers and they turned me onto this show that was on WNYU at the time called Noise the Show. I would sit in my garage with my brothers’ Panasonic boombox with the tape recorder on pause waiting for the show to come on. I heard bands like Naked Raygun and all sorts of stuff. When I heard that music, I got it and I totally understood it and I immediately felt, ‘This is where I belong’. It wasn’t something like ‘Well, I kinda like it’. It was instantly my life. That’s how it was for me at least.

I grew up in Queens and that’s where I got turned onto Hardcore. So for me, Queens was a huge, huge part of it. Reagan Youth were from Queens. Murphy’s Law were from Queens. The guy who played bass in The Mob worked in the 7-11 up the street from my house. You felt where you lived was churning out all this fantastic music that was going into the scene. Later on, you had Sick of it All and Gorilla Biscuits. You couldn’t help but take pride in it.

But by the time I got into Token Entry as the second vocalist, the NYHC scene was going through a lot of changes.

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First, there was the crossover thing. It seemed when Agnostic Front came out with ‘Cause for Alarm’, that’s when it really felt the Metal thing was becoming too much. They went from ‘Victim in Pain’ to this and people were like ‘What’s going on?’ It was hard to set a boundary on the Metal that was OK and the Metal that was forbidden. I remember seeing a show with Megadeth, The Bad Brains and Voivod. It was a New Music Seminar show. It was an incredible night. Bad Brains opened with ‘Pay to Cum’ and me and my friends went fuckin’ ballistic. But when Megadeth came on, I was like ‘Fuck these guys’. I didn’t want any part of it. It was unacceptable. I didn’t think that was part of the scene. But then Voivod came on and they were fucking amazing. Megadeth was something I couldn’t understand, but Voivod I could get behind. I think it all had to do with the feeling of the music. Some of these bands still had some kind of Rock ‘N’ Roll vibe to them and some had the raw vibe of Hardcore that I could relate to.

And a band like Leeway was a complete crossover band, but I wouldn’t think of them as a crossover band. The Crumbsuckers were such a Metal band, and I didn’t think of them in that way. Then you had P.M.S which stood for Pre-Metal Syndrome. They were an all-girl Metal band. We’d go and see them and support then. I never considered it Metal. It wasn’t until D.R.I. put out the album ‘Crossover’ that I was like ‘What the fuck is this? This is bullshit!’

Then there was the youth crew thing. The New York scene need that insurgence. The scene was slowing down, but when that Youth Crew thing happened, it exploded. I used to say ‘Oh this sucks, there’s all these new kids here’. I thought the scene was my secret and my safe place. Then I came to realize, if I wanted to change something, it would be easier to change it if I had a hundred and fifty people on my side rather than just ten. When I realized that, I stopped being angry at all these faces I didn’t know. I was like ‘Hopefully, they’ll stick it out and hang around. They’re not just going to hang around for the summer and leave’.

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It would be hard to call Token Entry a Youth Crew band; basically because Mickie was ten years older than everybody! Mickie was already an old man. We didn’t fit in with the crusty punks either, but we hung out with them. Token Entry would be considered posi-core I guess. I guess that’s the best way to put it. We never seemed to fit in with any of the bands in New York in a way. We’d play shows with all the bands of that time, but we were left out of all those compilations and stuff; who knows why. I’m not going to try and figure that out all these years later.

The Cro-Mags came out with ‘The Age of Quarrel’ LP around that time too. When that Cro-Mags record came out, it became apparent that it was going to be huge. This isn’t Cro-Mags just playing CB’s anymore. This wasn’t a DIY thing. This was a record on a real record label. I remember thinking ‘The Cro-Mags are going to play Madison Square Garden’. They were one of the few bands I believed were going to support themselves off of their music. When that record came out, I thought ‘These guys don’t have to work again’. That’s what I believed. And they were scary! If you went to the store and picked that record up and bought it, it was a line in the sand. You either put it on or said ‘This is way too scary for me’ or you said ‘I can relate to this’. I understand this frustration and this fear and I’m in it.

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There was a lot of backlash to bands getting larger and working outside of the scene. I think every kid in the scene goes through a phase where they think ‘If this band is signed to a major label, I don’t want to know anything about you’. I think everybody goes through that. But as grown man, I know my speakers and my turntable don’t know how much I paid for that record. It’s an emotional thing. Whether I paid two dollars and fifty cents for this record or fifteen dollars or eight-five dollars, it’s the emotions that evoke in me is what matters.

Shit like fights would happen all the time, but that was part of the belonging. I’d see these guys every Sunday and I don’t them other than here, but I know that if somebody came up to me and started shit, half of these guys would have my back. That was such a great feeling. When you’re a disgruntled youth, that’s what you want. That feeling of belonging.

For me, NYHC was who was there. All my peers were making music. It was guys I went to school with. Guys I hung out with. It was all of my friends. We hung out and laughed and joked. We talked about serious shit and fought together. It was so important to me because it was people I respected and held dear in my heart and still do. For me, it was important about who it was, not so much of what it was.

TOKEN ENTRY OUTSIDE OF CBGB'S | PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

TOKEN ENTRY OUTSIDE OF CBGB’S | PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

PRE-ORDERS ARE OPEN FOR NYHC 1980 – 1990
September 17th, 2014 by Tony
JUST ANOTHER SUNDAY ON THE BOWERY | PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

JUST ANOTHER SUNDAY ON THE BOWERY | PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

Pre-orders are now open on the Bazillion Points website for the book ‘New York Hardcore 1980 – 1990′ by DCXX’s Tony Rettman. All pre-orders will ship December 3rd, 2014 and will come accompanied with an embroidered patch of Sean Taggart artwork as well as a metal badge.

Follow the link below to not only put in your early order, but to check out pictures of proof pages for the book as well as a sneak peak at the chapter, ‘A7 & 2+2 : East Village Nights’.

You can pre-order the book and check out all that stuff right here and be sure to stay tuned to DCXX’s for the raw, uncut interviews conducted for the book along with announcements of book events and whole lot more.

MY RULES – BOOK LAUNCH AND DISCUSSION IN BROOKLYN 9/23/2014
September 16th, 2014 by Tim

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Legendary photographer and artist Glen E. Friedman celebrates the release of a career-spanning compendium of work at his first ever Brooklyn event. Featuring a conversation with Ian Svenonius, special edition vegan burgers made on the premises by Brooks Headley of Del Posto, and a raffle for a special signed Dogtown deck donated by Jim Muir.

The definitive monograph of Glen E. Friedman—the iconic skate, punk, and hip-hop photographer, often called the most important photographer of his generation, known for masterfully capturing and promoting rebellion in the cultures which he helped shape and define with his art.
 
My Rules is the best of his first two highly sought-after books, here bigger and better than ever—featuring never-before seen photographs of Black Flag, Public Enemy, Run-DMC, Minor Threat, Bad Brains, Beastie Boys, Dead Kennedys, and Ice-T, as well as classic skateboarding originators Tony Alva, Jay Adams, Lance Mountain, “Ollie” Gelfand, and Tony Hawk, just to name a few.
 
My Rules also features personal reflections from some of Friedman’s most well-known subjects, giving its readers an unprecedented window into the most significant radical youth countercultures of the last 40 years.