NYHC 1980 – 1990 THE RAW INTERVIEWS – RAY CAPPO PART II
January 29th, 2015 by Tony
RAY AND WALTER WITH YOUTH OF TODAY IN WIGAN, UK, 1989

RAY AND WALTER WITH YOUTH OF TODAY IN WIGAN, UK, 1989

When Porcell and I started Youth of Today, we wanted to take it seriously. We thought Straight Edge was an important message. We wanted to take it seriously and travel around the world. I guess it was a lofty idea. Our dream was to put out a record and travel around America and we ended up doing so much more than that.

It became quite a phenomenon very quickly. We played at CBGB’s in New York with Agnostic Front and Damage. It was right before ‘Can’t Close My Eyes’ came out. I’m a big mouth, and I was really into Straight Edge. Back then, no one was Straight Edge in New York so I really went off and had a little bit of an attitude.

So, we played this show at CBGB’s and left and went to California to tour with 7 Seconds. They put out our single on their label, Positive Force. We got back and everybody was Straight Edge. It was unbelievable.
I remember coming back from that tour and seeing Todd Youth on the street and he grabbed me and said ‘Check this out, I’m Straight Edge now!’ I was like ‘You’re kidding!’ and he was like ‘No, even Raybeez is Straight Edge’ and I was like ‘Now I know you’re kidding’. I knew Raybeez from hanging out from way back and he was far from Straight Edge. Sure enough, we go to hang out with Raybeez and he’s got an X on his hand and says to me ‘We’re all Straight Edge now!’

It was also after when we came back from that tour of California with 7 Seconds, we decided to move to New York City and it took over New York quick.

RAY WITH YOUTH OF TODAY AT CBGB, NYC

RAY WITH YOUTH OF TODAY AT CBGB, NYC

The timing was so right because there was this whole influx of new people. There was this generation of kids like us who loved the old New York scene. We loved Agnostic Front, Cause for Alarm, The Abused and Urban Waste, but wanted to put our own stamp on it.

I think that era of NYHC in 1985 was when it really came into something. For people to think Hardcore stopped in 1985; maybe that’s just because they weren’t into Hardcore anymore. It might have been a personal thing. Truthfully, that’s when New York took off. Look at the bands that came out of that era: Sick of It All, Youth of Today, Agnostic Front and Cro-Mags. A big part of the New York scene happened post-’85. That’s when Agnostic Front became a global band.

Again, that’s not to take anything from the earlier era. ’82 NYHC was really cool, but it never really left New York. The Abused and Urban Waste were cult bands. Once again, that doesn’t take anything away from them. If there were no Urban Waste or The Abused, there definitely would be no Youth of Today because we literally copied them.

RAY WITH YOUTH OF TODAY AT CBGB, 1987 | PHOTO: BRIAN J QUINN

RAY WITH YOUTH OF TODAY AT CBGB, 1987 | PHOTO: BRIAN J QUINN

But Youth of Today brought a suburban element to the NYHC scene. I guess there was always a suburban element to the scene, but I think Youth of Today made it easier not to be a bad ass to hang out. You don’t have to be a criminal to hang out. You don’t have to be a drug addict to hang out.

Truthfully, a lot of the people that fell in on the Lower East Side and squatted down there, most of them were not from New York City. Not many people grew up in New York City. New York City was a hub. There was an influx of kids from the suburbs that would come up. There were kids that thought ‘I can relate to Hardcore, but I can’t relate to the negative elements’. To me, that was real deterrent because I wasn’t into drugs or the ‘live fast die young’ thing. The Straight Edge thing let you become a part of that scene but still have ethics, morals and self-integrity. That being said, the music was the common thread that brought all these different personalities all together.

When Jordan and I started Revelation and put out the ‘Together’ compilation, we really thought we were representing what NYHC was at the time. We were together and coming from all different places and coming together in the collective of alternative music. Truthfully, we were the alternative to what was going on back then. It was a great time to be in New York and making music.

RAY AND PROCELL WITH YOUTH OF TODAY AT THE STAMFORD, CT ANTHRAX

RAY AND PROCELL WITH YOUTH OF TODAY AT THE STAMFORD, CT ANTHRAX

DEATHBED
January 28th, 2015 by Tim
ROB FISH WITH 108 | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

ROB FISH WITH 108 | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

TICKETS ON SALE TODAY FOR NATEFEST
January 26th, 2015 by Tim
CLICK ON IMAGE ABOVE TO BUY TICKETS

CLICK ON IMAGE ABOVE TO PURCHASE TICKETS

PROCESS BLACK
January 22nd, 2015 by Ed

Process Black is a new band featuring members of Kiss it Goodbye, Lumbar, Cascabel, Deadguy, Craft Spells, No Escape, Roareth, iamthethorn, etc. Above is a demo of their first three songs, check it out.

Process Black:
Tim Singer – Throat
Brock Lowry – Percussion
Aaron Edge – Strings

REALITY RECORDS ANNOUNCES LEEWAY DISCOGRAPHY RE-RELEASES
January 22nd, 2015 by Tim

leeway

In our 15 years history as a label we are exultant that we can announce the following news:

We’re going to re-release the 4 LEEWAY full lengths on Reality Records!

LEEWAY brought us some of the best crossover / thrash / hardcore ever written and is still a big influence to a lot of current and new bands in our scene! These albums were long out of print and deserve the right sound! ‘Born To Expire’ & ‘Desperate Measures’ can be considered as milestones in the hardcore history worlwide, while ‘Adult Crash’ and ‘Open Mouth Kiss’ are just way to underrated!

All of them will be remastered, will come with an extensive booklet and on top of that, every album will contain loads of bonustracks!

The formats we’re offering: CD / LP / digital!
Expect ‘Born To Expire’ and ‘Desperate Measures’ to be released in spring 2015!
‘Adult Crash’ and ‘Open Mouth Kiss’ will be released later on this year around fall/winter 2015!

Check out this Reality Records Facebook

Check out this Reality Records

NYHC CHRONICLES – TRAILER
January 22nd, 2015 by Larry

Director Drew Stone (xxx All Ages xxx The Boston Hardcore Film, “Who the F*$@ Is That Guy?” The Fabulous Journey of Michael Alago) is slated to direct “The New York Hardcore Chronicles Film.” Centered on the community and culture of the iconic New York hardcore music scene, the film will be produced by Stone Films NYC for a 2016 release.

“My intention is not to make a film documenting the history of New York hardcore, but to tell the story in an episodic format with the thread of New York hardcore running through it,” said Stone. “For example, the ‘Spray Paint the Walls’ segment explores the connection between graffiti and New York hardcore. In ‘The Return to the A7,’ Roger Miret and Vinnie Stigma of Agnostic Front re-visit the legendary A7 club, the birthplace of New York hardcore, for the first time in over 30 years.”

“I’m really looking forward to this film, as a fan of the hardcore genre/culture in general, and of course the special New York hardcore faction we’re all part of,” said Freddy Cricien (Madball). “I go way back with Drew Stone — he actually filmed Madball’s very first video, and I consider him a friend. He has the credibility, the experience and — most importantly — the passion to deliver something super authentic, which for me and I’m sure a lot of folks, is most important of all!”

There will be a 20-minute “excerpt screening” as part of a book release party for NYHC New York Hardcore 1980-1990 by Tony Rettman at 3:00 p.m. on Sunday, March 1 at the Grand Victory in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The Nihilistics, The High & The Mighty & Altercation will be playing the event.

NYHC 1980 – 1990 – THE RAW INTERVIEWS – RAY CAPPO – PART I
January 20th, 2015 by Tony
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RAY CAPPO AND CRAIG AHEAD WITH YOUTH OF TODAY AT CBGB’S, NYC, 1986 | PHOTO: KATHLEEN TOBIN

First off, I would personally like to thank everyone who snagged a copy of ‘NYHC 1980 – 1990′. I am truly humbled by the response the book received. The demand for the book was so out of control in fact that the first printing dried up rather quickly and left some out in the cold in regards of getting a copy. But don’t fear! The second printing of ‘NYHC 1980 – 1990′ will be hitting the book store shelves in the next few weeks with added photos and much more.

To celebrate both the reaction to the first printing and the upcoming second printing, I decided to go back into the vaults and pull out another interview conducted for the book and throw it up here on DCXX. This time around, we have a lengthy interview with all around NYHC icon, Ray Cappo.

This interview will be split into several installments due to its length, but in this first part, Ray speaks about his introduction into the Hardcore scene and the formation and initial shows of his first band, Violent Children.

Enjoy — Tony

RAY CAPPO GOES FOR A DIVE AT THE ANTHRAX DURING BOLD, 1987 | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

RAY CAPPO GOES FOR A DIVE AT THE ANTHRAX DURING BOLD, 1987 | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

Truthfully, I didn’t even know anything was going on in Connecticut even though Connecticut had a very striving scene. I lived in Danbury which was an hour and fifteen minutes from New York City on the Metro North train. My parents were sort of New Yorkers and my brothers and sisters were all older and they lived in the city. I used to go to New York City on weekends and my parents were cool with it because they figured I’d stay with my brothers or sisters and everything would be cool. Little did they know! I would just say ‘I’m going to see some music this weekend’. I’d keep it pretty vague. They had no idea I was hanging out on the Lower East Side all weekend. My first real introduction was I liked alternative music. I wasn’t quite sure of what Hardcore was at that point. Then I stumbled into CBGB’s when the UK Subs were playing one night. The Young and The Useless were playing, which was guys from the Beastie Boys. Once I saw the Young and The Useless, I thought ‘These are kids that are my age. I can do this’.

Usually, growing up in a suburban American high school environment, if you’re in a band, you’re in a cover band; at least back when I was growing up. Kids were playing the best of AC/DC, the best of Rush, the best of Journey. I always thought that was so lame. So when I saw these bands that weren’t technically good, but playing from their heart in some random nightclub, I thought it was the coolest thing ever.

I was with a girlfriend at the time and she goes ‘Ray, you could do this! You should start a band!’ So when I got back to my typical American high school, I grabbed three of my friends who were the only three guys into alternative music and said ‘Let’s start a band’. That’s when we started the band Violent Children.

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RAY WITH THE STAGE MOSH DURING AGNOSTIC FRONT AT CBGB’S, NYC | PHOTO COURTESY OF: ALEXA POLI-SCHEIGERT

From then on, CBGB’s became my escape from my world. It was a great place. You could see incredible bands for three dollars. It was almost like walking into a comic book with super heroes and villains and characters that were bigger than life. That’s what the New York scene was like. The characters on the scene were bigger and more colorful than the black and white people in your high school. There was no Raybeez or Vinnie Stigma or Harley Flanagan in your high school. These guys were bigger than life. When you would go back to your high school on a Monday morning and try to explain the bands you saw or how you saw one guy hit another guy over the head with a beer bottle, people would ask ‘Where do you go where you see people hitting each other over the head with beer bottles?’ At that point in life, the only place you should be seeing something like that is in a movie.

In 1982, there were barely any records. The only bands from New York that had records out were the False Prophets, Kraut and The Misguided. The only places you could hear this stuff were on these late night college radio shows. In my hometown, was the Danbury State College radio station and there was a radio show where it would be a mix between Duran Duran or INXS or Men Without Hats or Oingo Boingo with stuff like Dead Kennedys or Flipper or Youth Brigade or Minor Threat. So we thought ‘Let’s make a demo tape and get it played on this radio station!’ We made this really shitty demo tape and then we went to this radio station at midnight and threw pebbles against the window and the guy opened the window and we were like ‘Hey! We’re in a Hardcore band!’ The guy was so psyched that Danbury, Connecticut had a Hardcore band. We asked him to play our demo and he actually played our demo. He was saying ‘We have Danbury Connecticut’s only Hardcore band Violent Children in the studio!’ It was so cool.

That night, we got two phone calls. One was the guy who owned the club The Anthrax, which wasn’t quite a club yet. He said they were doing a benefit to open the Anthrax and he wanted us to play. He explained how The Anthrax would be an art gallery and a band hangout place. We got our first gig from that radio show. Check out the lineup: Violent Children, CIA, Agnostic Front, Cause for Alarm, Hose, Reflex from Pain and Lost Generation. It was a big massive line-up. We couldn’t believe we were going to be playing with all our favorite bands. When you’re in high school and your favorite band is Aerosmith, you’re never going to play with them. But here we were, listening to these bands and we’re playing our first gig with them.The second phone call was from Johnny Stiff calling in from New York. He booked shows at A7 and CBGB’s and offered us a show. So, from being on one radio show, we went from being a local band to getting out of state gigs.

At the Anthrax benefit, we were the second band on the bill and after the set, the police busted in and raided the place because we were all underage. All the underage people were hiding under the stage for the rest of the night. For a sixteen year old kid, it was probably the most exciting thing to happen. For your band to be playing with all your favorite bands at a big show and now it gets raided by the cops and you got to get home without your parents finding out. You had to get home without your father knowing you borrowed his car. It was a whole new, exciting thing.

violent children degenerik blog

THE ICEMEN
January 15th, 2015 by Tim
THE ICEMEN AT CBGB, NYC | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

THE ICEMEN AT CBGB, NYC | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

WIDE AWAKE AT THE ANTHRAX
January 13th, 2015 by Tim

RUNNING LIKE THIEVES
January 11th, 2015 by Tim
RUNNING LIKE THIEVES AT THE HOMEBASE, WILKES BARE PA, DECEMBER 2001 | PHOTO: TRACI MCMAHON

RUNNING LIKE THIEVES AT THE HOMEBASE, WILKES BARE PA, DECEMBER 2001 | PHOTO: TRACI MCMAHON

One of my favorite bands from the 2000’s era of hardcore so far, totally underrated. The combination of Matt Warnke’s vocals/lyrics and song writing with the musicianship and songwriting of Biv and Andy from Supertouch and their bassist Scott, made for a killer collaboration. I saw these guys every chance I could get and traveled all over the east coast for them. From late Tuesday night’s in Brooklyn to random shows all the way out in the boondocks of Pennsylvania and Virginia , it was always worth it. Still kills me that so many of their best songs never got a proper recording. Another one of those blips on the radar screen of hardcore that will stick with me forever. -Tim DCXX