UNRESTRAINED
August 4th, 2014 by Tim

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I keep saying I want to regularly do spotlight type pieces on some newer, up and coming type bands, but it’s just been hard to get the time to devote to actually make them happen. If I’ve talked to you and offered to do something like this for your band, I do still intend to do it, it’s just a matter of time, so hang in there. This one here is on Unrestrained from Portland. Unrestrained’s drummer, Jon Sinko, is an old Jersey guy that I’ve known for a long time, so I was more than happy to help get the word out on them. So read up and check em’ out. -Tim DCXX

Who’s in the band, where are you from, give us a little history on each member.
Justin: We’re from Portland, OR, and carry five members:

Jon is originally from New Jersey, and spent time playing drums in Backlash a million years ago.

Poop (yes, Poop) plays guitar and is originally form Salem, OR, which is about an hour south of Portland.  He has also spent time in The Physical Challenge, Life & Limb and No Secrets Between Sailors.

Raf plays bass, and came to Oregon via Hawaii.  He was in some bands back there such as x36 Chamberx, Cooperstown and Hell Yeah Bowlers.

Ryan is from Southern California and also plays guitar.  However, Ryan is moving to NYC soon, so the hunt for another guitar player has begun.

I guess I’m the only Portland native, although Poop might as well count as one too.  We actually both used to be in a band called The Dead Unknown in the early 2000s.  Aside from the band, I also run Stuck In The Past (http://stuckinthepast.net) with a couple of friends.

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What is your motivation, inspiration and goals for Unrestrained and how would you describe the band
Jon: To me Unrestrained is about five guys playing the style of music that we love to play, and doing it in a way that is real to each of us. We each have parts of us that pay tribute to what hardcore has meant to us growing up- from preferring basement shows over big venues, to limited edition vinyl vs one at a time iTunes singles, to being a voice for causes that may or not be at the forefront of conversation to some of the kids we run into these days. I think our inspiration comes from bands like Undertow, Trial, Threadbare and For The Love Of musically but I’m inspired personally by the many friends who are just continuing to be involved in the scene- big or small. Goal-wise- I’d be stoked to just keep doing what we love to do and grow organically to be a band that means something to people and who drives them to get involved in making and supporting music.

Justin: Jon hit on some things that continue to drive me with this band. I want everything that Unrestrained does to be completely organic.  I don’t want to purposely push ourselves into any one direction, or work ourselves into some sort of sub-genre mold. Although social and political issues pop up in songs, a large majority of our songs have been used as a vehicle for me to vent about things occurring in my personal life. Struggles and fears are coming to the forefront lyrically, and it has been extremely cathartic for me to put it out there. I know we’ll never be the most popular band, and I’m very content with that. Playing songs born out of frustration, anger and sadness makes me want to play dark, dank basements anyways. As long as we’re all one the same page, and putting forth this same level of passion, I think the band can continue for quite some time.

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You guys do a cover of No Escape’s “Framework” and recorded it with guest vocals by Tim Singer, how and why did you guys decide on doing this and how did it all come together with Tim Singer’s involvement?
Jon: So we have a band rule- each member can pick a cover song and we don’t change the song until we play it live at least once. Right after Hurricane Sandy knocked out the east coast- I really wanted to focus my energy on paying tribute to New Jersey and NJHC bands. I think I talked to you (Tim DCXX) about trying to do a NJHC- The Way It Was style comp- at one point. Anyway- I wanted to do No Escape cause 1) they were an amazing band 2) they were a band I thought kids nowadays needed to know 3) I had hopes that I could get Tim to sing on it. I’d known Tim from playing shows together with Backlash and Deadguy so I hit him up and long story short- he was into it. When we first got the vocal tracks it was pretty crazy. If you’ve ever listened to just vocals before it’s pretty different. He did three tracks which Justin worked with to get just right so he and Tim battle back and forth on verses and he lets Tim freestyle throughout. It still stokes me out that this happened. I’m pretty proud of this song. Definitely the only genre you can record a track from one of your favorite bands and likely get the singer to do guest vocals. Pretty rad.

Any plugs or info you want to get out there?
Justin: Our new LP, Forward Onto Death, is out now on Trip Machine Laboratories (http://tripmachinelabs.com). If you’d like, you can keep up with us on facebook (http://facebook.com/unrestrainedpdx) or any other number of social networking sites that we’re easy to find on. We also have a webstore at http://unrestrained.limitedrun.com and are in the process of writing an EP to follow up this new LP. And thanks to DCXX for wanting to do something with us. It’s a true pleasure to be represented on a site that I read all the time.

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DETROIT PUNKS EPISODE 1: JOHN BRANNON
July 31st, 2014 by Larry

John Brannon: lead singer of Negative Approach, Laughing Hyenas, and Easy Action.

DANZIG “BODIES” UNRELEASED FOOTAGE
July 30th, 2014 by Ed

NYHC 1980 – 1990 BY DCXX’S TONY RETTMAN DUE OUT IN NOVEMBER
July 24th, 2014 by Tony
REST IN PIECES AT CBGB'S | PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

REST IN PIECES AT CBGB’S | PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

“New York City has an energy that you’re not going to find anywhere else. People who have that passionate, driven mindset; they gravitate to New York City. You couldn’t match it anywhere else. Even being in that intense environment—you had to come into your own to survive that area.”—John Porcelly, Youth of Today/Shelter

Known for its glamorous 1970s punk rock scene, New York City matched the grim urban reality of the 1980s with a rawer musical uprising: New York hardcore. As bands of misfits from across the region gravitated to the forgotten frontier of Manhattan’s Lower East Side. With a a backdrop of despair, bands like Agnostic Front, Cro-Mags, Murphy’s Law, and Youth of Today confronted their reality with relentlessly energetic gigs at CBGB, A7, and the numerous squats in the area.

Tony Rettman’s ambitious oral history captures ten years of struggling, including the scene’s regional rivalries with D.C. and Boston, the birth of moshing, the clash and coming to terms of hardcore and heavy metal, the straightedge movement, and the unlikely influence of Krishna consciousness.

NYHC slams the sidewalk with savage tales of larger-than-life characters and unlikely feats of willpower. The gripping and sometimes hilarious narrative is woven together like the fabric of New York itself from over 100 original interviews with members of Absolution, Adrenalin O.D., Agnostic Front, Antidote, Bad Brains, Bloodclot, Bold, Born Against, Breakdown, Cause for Alarm, Citizen Arrest, Cro-Mags, Crumbsuckers, Death Before Dishonor, Even Worse, False Prophets, Gorilla Biscuits, H20, Heart Attack, Inhuman, Into Another, Irate, Judge, Kraut, Leeway, Life’s Blood, Major Conflict, Murphy’s Law, Nausea, Nihilistics, Nuclear Assault, Numskulls, Outburst, Pro-Pain, Quicksand, Raw Deal, Reagan Youth, Rorschach, S.O.D., Sacrilege, Savage Circle, Sheer Terror, Shelter, Shok, Sick of it All, Side by Side, Skinhead Youth, Straight Ahead, the Abused, the Cryptcrashers, the Mad, the Misfits, the Misguided, the Mob, the Psychos, the Ritz, the Stimulators, the Undead, Token Entry, Underdog, Urban Waste, Virus, Warzone, Youth of Today, and many, many more.

MOSH IT UP!

“In other parts of our neighborhood, guys were breakdancing against each other; we were moshing against each other. It was all about who had the most style, as opposed to today where it’s just picking up change and karate kicking. It was all about trying to keep dancing, while still blasting into someone from D.C. or Boston, and all about who had the hardest pit for their town’s band. It was like supporting your city’s hockey team or something.”—Jimmy G, Murphy’s Law

“At that time, the Lower East Side was a warzone. It wasn’t the gentrified neighborhood that it’s been for the last twenty years. It was a fucking warzone, without question. It was worse than the worse neighborhoods you know in New York City today. It was a trip to be down there and go to those bars and A7 and shit like that. I wasn’t even eighteen yet, and I was getting a peek into a world that most people will never see.”—Eddie Sutton, Leeway

“I had my personal experiences from life; being on the streets, being locked up, and being in abusive foster homes. I was fighting. I was shot and stabbed, and that’s what came out. We sang about street justice and survival on the streets because that shit was for real. That shit was a way to express ourselves and get out that angst. It was real. It wasn’t some hypothetical bullshit.”—John Joseph, Cro-Mags

DOUBLE CROSS will be the exclusive source for info on ‘NYHC 1980 – 1990′ leading up to the books’ release. Expect chapter excerpts, uncut interviews, photos, flyers and much, much more!

OCTOBER COMING FIRE
July 16th, 2014 by Ed

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PURE FUN SKATE ZINE RELEASE PARTY
July 14th, 2014 by Larry

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The day has finally arrived. The brand new issue of Pure Fun Skate Zine will be released on August 31st. Come celebrate with us at the release party.

Johnny Rad and the Eggplants will be playing all their hits from the classic Bones Brigade videos and a ton of other original tunes.

There will be a rare live appearance from Noise For The Needy featuring Hagop Najarian, Lance Mountain and Neil Blender.

Skatemaster Tate will be DJ’ing the party and he’ll be spinning everything from Sinatra to the Sex Pistols.

There will be one other band to be announced and we’ll be posting any other details on this event as they become available.

The event is all ages. Skateboarding and music is for everyone so come one, come all. It’s all happening on August 31st at Dipiazzas in Long Beach, CA. Be there or be square.

Facebook Event Page

INFEST AT THE WICK – BROOKLYN, NY JUNE 28TH, 2014
June 29th, 2014 by Ed

SHOW MEMORIES WITH KEVIN SECONDS
June 26th, 2014 by Tim

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Sparks, Nevada. In 1984, I rented a space with a big roll-up door for $300 a month. I told the landlord that I needed it for screen-printing. I lied. There wasn’t even any running water but he rented the space to me any way.

I decided to call it The Crib. I don’t remember why.

In the short amount of time I had the space,I did about 10 shows and a shitload of punk rock parties. I miss being able to rent out spots like this, relatively cheaply.

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At the time, this was the biggest punk rock show to happen in Reno. Definitely one of the biggest shows Positive Force ever did. It was an amazing gig. I almost went to jail that night because I booked it without a dance permit.

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1983. I have very vague memories of this gig. I believe it was our first ever Santa Cruz show. Actually, scratch that. We played a party gig there the year before. Double Cross were our buddies from Grass Valley. A great, young HC band. Tales Of Terror and Verbal Abuse need no introduction.

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1983. Boise, Idaho. A legendary show that almost didn’t happen. World-renowned punk rock artist Pushead – living in Boise at the time – called and asked us to come open for The Misfits and Poison Idea and we jumped at the chance to. Unfortunately, The Misfits canceled a week or so before the show. Pushead asked us if we still wanted to come play and we said yes. We brought our fellow Skeeno hardcore buddies Jackshit up with us and I’m glad we did because it was one of the funnest shows we had done, up to that point.

Fucked up part of the story. On the way back to Reno, Steve Youth’s Rickenbacker bass – which, along with a bunch of other stuff, was strapped to the roof of one of the cars we drove up in – feel off somewhere between Boise and Reno. We drove almost 200 miles back towards Boise to find it before turning back, no Rick and our tails between our legs. So sad.

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1983. Reno, Nevada. Reno was fortunate to have Minor Threat come through town not once but twice in their short life. Ian and the boys were always extremely gracious and support of me, 7Secs and the Reno punk/hardcore community.

This show was a rager and featured 2 of the best hardcore bands Reno/Sparks/Lake Tahoe had to offer – Jackshit and Urban Assault.

KEVIN SECONDS PART IV – THE FINAL ENTRY
June 20th, 2014 by Tony
7 SECONDS AT THE INFAMOUS ABE'S STEAKHOUSE GIG IN PHILLY '84| PHOTO: MARK PINGATORE

7 SECONDS AT THE INFAMOUS ABE’S STEAKHOUSE GIG IN PHILLY ’84 | PHOTO: MARK PINGATORE

You recorded the ‘Walk Together, Rock Together’ 12” on the ’84 tour with Ian MacKaye at Inner Ear Studios. Any memories of that recording? What motivated the writing of the title track?
The writing was going on during the tour. I was way into keeping a journal back in those days – still am but just not as consistently – and I was always jotting down thoughts and lyrical ideas. The song ‘Walk Together, Rock Together’ was loosely inspired by a really fucked up incident that happened at a show in Green Bay on the tour. Or I should say, it happened at what would have been a show in Green Bay. Some local metal heads decided that punk rockers were an easy target and came to the venue – a pizza joint – to bust heads. A small riot ensued and the show was shut down before we got a chance to play. But it struck me how insane and stupid it was that young rocker kids, who were basically fuck-ups and misfits, looked at young punk kids, who were fuck-ups and misfits, as some sort of threat or enemy. In my mind, it just didn’t add up so I used that particular incident as the basis for the song.

Our experience with Ian and Don Zientara at Inner Ear Studios was pretty incredible. Ian seemed to get what we were going for. It was funny because he was our age and yet seemed to have his shit really together, unlike us (haha). He really knew his way around the studio and he and Don had a great rapport and made it a really fun experience.

7 SECONDS IN THE FALL OF 1985 AT THE C.E. CENTER IN PHILLY| PHOTO: MARK PINGATORE

7 SECONDS IN THE FALL OF 1985 AT THE C.E. CENTER IN PHILLY| PHOTO: MARK PINGATORE

A year or so later, you started to write the material for the ‘New Wind’; kind of the ultimate ‘departure’ record. What was the motivation?
I’m not sure that we saw it as a departure. We weren’t attempting to bail on hardcore or punk rock. We just got caught up on our many influences and were pretty shell-shocked by the amount of violence we were seeing at punk rock and hardcore shows, especially in Southern California. I had written a lot of the New Wind material at home and had pondered starting a whole new side project that would be more of a melodic, mid-tempo type of thing but I played the songs for the guys and they seemed to love them and we decided to record them as 7 Seconds. It probably wasn’t the smartest thing to do, after the success and popularity of both The Crew and Walk Together, Rock Together but we weren’t thinking about being smart at the time (haha).

I’ve said this many times but I just don’t recall us ever having some focused idea or us being so driven by a particular idea that we looked at doing different things musically as some sort of way to gain a wider audience. We just wanted to feel like we could control our own creative destiny and at the same time, we had all this activism running through our veins that we wanted to maintain.

Was there backlash from anyone in regards to the ‘new sound’
Absolutely, there was. No one took the amount of shit from the hardcore scene as we did. People were pissed, sending us death threats. I remember several shows where kids would stand up front and were just visibly bawling their eyes out, they were so disappointed and disenchanted by us. It was really frustrating and depressing and it did get under our skin. Ultimately though, it helped us grow a thicker skin.

7 SECONDS AT THE DISCHORD HOUSE AND ON THE ROAD DURING THE 1985 NORTH AMERICAN TOUR | PHOTOS: GALEN YOUNG

7 SECONDS AT THE DISCHORD HOUSE AND ON THE ROAD DURING THE 1985 NORTH AMERICAN TOUR | PHOTOS: GALEN YOUNG

SURF PUNKS WE’RE NOT – SKATEBOARDS WE DO
June 17th, 2014 by Tim
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BRIAN BRANNON OF JFA WITH A BACKSIDE POOL GRIND | PHOTO: PING!