GREG ANDERSON OF BROTHERHOOD – PART III
September 1st, 2014 by Tony
BROTHERHOOD'S SECOND BASS PLAYER, CHRIS CHARLOT | PHOTO COURTESY OF: RON GUARDIPEE

BROTHERHOOD’S SECOND BASS PLAYER, CHRIS CHARLOT | PHOTO COURTESY OF: RON GUARDIPEE

Before we left on that tour with The Accused, Nate left the band. He was really only there to help us out. He had his other band Christ on a Crutch and wanted to go full bore with them and tour. But he told us, ‘There’s a friend of mine who is a good bass player who is also from the Tri-Cities. He loves your band and he’s totally Straight Edge and he’s moving here next week’. It was so weird how easy it was, but we were like ‘Score!’ and went along with it. So, Chris Charlot joined on bass and that changed things a little bit, but we were so fired to tour with The Accused it didn’t matter.

The tour with The Accused was really what broke up the band. No one was getting along towards the end; we eventually got on each other’s’ nerves. It was everyone’s first time being on tour and if you’ve ever been on tour, you know it takes some quick thinking skills to survive. We were young and being in a confined space with three other people took its toll. People started hating each other and stupid behavior came out. Looking back, it was normal stuff, but if you’re young and don’t know how to deal with it, it becomes a disaster. I came home from that tour hating every single one of the people in the band. They drove me nuts and I know I drove them nuts too, but I came home thinking ‘I don’t want to do this anymore’.

BROTHERHOOD VOCALIST RON GUARDIPEE ROCKIN' THE CONS | PHOTO: SOUTHERN LORD

BROTHERHOOD VOCALIST RON GUARDIPEE ROCKIN’ THE CONS | PHOTO: SOUTHERN LORD

Going around the country on that tour, I started to get turned off by the Straight Edge thing. It was getting way too clean cut and way more about conformity than rebellion. It’s kind of funny when you look back how quickly your tastes change to set the mood when you’re young, but since I wasn’t into the whole Straight Edge thing anymore, I got really into Fugazi, Soulside, The Hated; if it was from D.C. I loved it. I went into full D.C. mode and Ron was getting into the super tough guy NYHC stuff. Vic was always really into the New York Dolls and Chris got really into grindcore. So, we were all totally different at this point and I couldn’t even imagine what kind of music we would make at that point. Ron tried to keep it together. He got another guitar player and I think another bass player but it didn’t last too long and we all moved onto other bands. I started a band with Nate that was full-on D.C. mode called Galleon’s Lap and Ron went onto Resolution.

BROTHERHOOD IN BOSTON | PHOTO COURTESY OF: SOUTHERN LORD

BROTHERHOOD IN BOSTON | PHOTO COURTESY OF: SOUTHERN LORD

The Brotherhood album that came out in the early 90’s on Crucial Response Records was Ron’s deal. At the point he worked out that deal with them, I did not give a shit about Brotherhood; I moved on. It wasn’t like I regretted making that music or that I hated it; I was just trying to concentrate on what music I was doing at that time. Ron was still holding onto the Straight Edge thing, so he struck the deal with Crucial Response to make that 12”. No one else in the band had any say on it and Crucial Response kept pressing it throughout the years. I looked upon that thing as a bootleg. The packaging was awful and finally I just thought we should do a proper re-issue of the Brotherhood stuff. Southern Lord has been re-issuing classic 80’s Hardcore for the past few years, so to re-issue the Brotherhood stuff made a whole lot of sense. I had the resources, knowledge and the distribution to get it out there, so we said ‘Fuck it, let’s do it ourselves’. Ron was looking to re-launch his label Overkill Records, so we made it a split release and it worked out great.

For people who don’t know the back story of Brotherhood, I’m sure they’re very confused by the discography coming out on Southern Lord. In the past few years, there’s been some internet rumor about how I don’t like to talk about Brotherhood or Straight Edge and I can be an asshole about it. That’s really not true. Brotherhood and everything I’ve done musically in my past is really important to me. Obviously, at this point in my life I’m a different person who has done all different types of music, but it’s still important and don’t regret any of it. Well, maybe some hairstyles or clothes that I look really silly in, but the music of Brotherhood is still very important to me. It was a starting point for everything I’ve done in my life.

THE FINAL DAYS OF BROTHERHOOD | PHOTO COURTESY OF: RON GUARDIPEE

THE FINAL DAYS OF BROTHERHOOD | PHOTO COURTESY OF: RON GUARDIPEE

One of the most important things about this record coming out is all the people involved are still close. I’m still friends with Nate and super close with Ron. Brotherhood was the catalyst for so much stuff; whether it’s Sunny Day Real Estate or Sunn O))). Most Sunn O))) fans probably wouldn’t get Brotherhood. They won’t get how it went from this rudimentary Hardcore to something like Sunn O))). But to me, it’s important to show where it all came from. Like I said before, If it wasn’t for Brotherhood, I wouldn’t have met Steve O’Malley.

And as much as I like re-issuing the Brotherhood stuff, I am not interested in reunions or anything like that. I’m a different person now. I was eighteen years old in Brotherhood. I’m forty-four years old now and I got three kids and married! I’m not in a one bedroom shitbox apartment anymore and being mad at people for doing drugs. I’m changing diapers around here, you know?!?

SANTA CRUZ VISITS TOM KNOX
August 28th, 2014 by Larry

Santa Cruz Skateboards catches up with street veteran and 80’s legend, Tom Knox, in his home town of Visalia Ca. Tom talks about turning pro for Santa Cruz and skates the spots he shredded in his classic video part from Speed Freaks.

SKATEBOARDING WITH JEFF NELSON OF MINOR THREAT
August 27th, 2014 by Tim
FROM FLIPSIDE FANZINE, ISSUE NUMBER 38, PUBLISHED IN 1983

FROM FLIPSIDE FANZINE, ISSUE NUMBER 38, PUBLISHED IN 1983

This was a 1983 video/photo shoot of the guys from Minor Threat skating at a Los Angeles elementary school. Glen E. Friedman was also in attendance snapping photos of Rodney Mullen. If you saw an earlier version of one of the Flipside Video Fanzines, video from this skate session were interspersed with live footage of the band from a gig at the Rollerworks.

Flipside Video Fanzines where a bit of a moving target. Once a 3/4 inch recording master tape was made, it would eventually get “eaten” while dubbing VHS tapes. We would then have to re-edit the entire master tape from scratch from the original VHS tapes. As such, editing points on Flipside Video Fanzines would vary over time. Later editions of the Video Fanzines reduced or eliminated the shots from the skate session. -Joseph Henderson (Flipside)

MINOR THREAT / SSD
August 24th, 2014 by Tim
BRIAN BAKER AND IAN WITH MINOR THREAT | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

BRIAN BAKER AND IAN WITH MINOR THREAT | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

SPRINGA, AL AND JAMIE WITH SSD AT A7 | PHOTO: GLEN E. FRIEDMAN

SPRINGA, AL AND JAMIE WITH SSD AT A7 | PHOTO: GLEN E. FRIEDMAN

JUDGE AT CITY GARDENS, 6/10/1990
August 23rd, 2014 by Tim

Judge firing on all cylinders, crushing heaviness to a completely packed room, it doesn’t get much better. Although stage diving was still banned at City Gardens, at that point, the energy flowed though that crowd like a high tension wire. Such a great show, one of my personal favorites from the years I went to shows there. – Tim DCXX

A TRIBUTE TO – DREW BERNSTEIN
August 22nd, 2014 by Tim
DREW SKATING, PLAYING WITH CRUCIFIX AND AMERICA'S HARDCORE | PHOTOS: FER YOUZ / UNKNOWN

DREW SKATING, PLAYING WITH CRUCIFIX AND AMERICA’S HARDCORE | PHOTOS: FER YOUZ / UNKNOWN

Gone but not forgotten, Drew Bernstein of America’s Hardcore, Crucifix, Suburbia and Lip Service. March 28, 1963 – August 18, 2014, rest in peace.

GLEN E. FRIEDMAN & IAN MACKAYE DISCUSS MY RULES
August 21st, 2014 by Larry

Old friends Glen E. Friedman and Ian MacKaye get together down at Dischord House just outside of Washington DC to discuss some of the photographs in Glen’s forthcoming book MY RULES.

You can pre-order the book HERE.

Upcoming book signings:

Tuesday 9/23 7-9pm at Power House Arena in Brooklyn, NY.
Thursday 9/25 6-8 Arcana Books in Culver City, CA.
Monday 9/29 7-9 Book Soup in Hollywood, CA.

JAY ADAMS R.I.P.
August 15th, 2014 by Larry
JAY ADAMS | PHOTO: GRANY BRITTAIN

JAY ADAMS | PHOTO: GRANT BRITTAIN

GREG ANDERSON OF BROTHERHOOD – PART TWO
August 13th, 2014 by Tony
BROTHERHOOD IN ACTION | PHOTO COURTESY OF: SOUTHERN LORD

BROTHERHOOD IN ACTION | PHOTO COURTESY OF: SOUTHERN LORD

From 1987 to 1996, it was illegal to have all ages shows in Seattle because they had a dance hall ordinance that outlawed all ages shows. You could only throw an all-ages show if you had a million dollar insurance deal to throw a show. No one had that! And that maybe was one of the reasons the whole grunge thing really thrived in Seattle because it was appealing to an older crowd that could get into bars. Even though everyone from that scene came from a Hardcore background, that’s the direction that they were going in. And that’s fine. I didn’t have any animosity towards the Sub Pop thing. I would have loved to check that stuff at the time, but I just couldn’t…by law!

So Brotherhood had shows in Bremerton and Tacoma. We played in this guys’ basement in Bremerton. It was a friend of mine named Lenny who Nate Mendel and I later ended up playing in a band with (Galleons Lap) The photo on the cover of the Brotherhood 7” was taken in his basement. It’s funny because there were maybe ten people there and that’s the cover of our record! Ten people at a show and you’re putting it on the cover of a record you’re going to press hundreds of! But we didn’t care! We were so amped on Straight Edge

With Ron and Nate in the band, things started to take off. We recorded a demo that people really dug and we were totally into tape trading across the country. That’s what really helped us was trading tapes with other bands and other fanzine guys. People seemed really psyched on Ron’s voice sounding like Springa from SSD, but honestly, I didn’t really notice it. I think I was so swept up in the new wave of Straight Edge Hardcore that I hadn’t listened to SSD in a while. That and the places we played had such crappy P.A.s’ that I couldn’t hear him! It wasn’t until we played a show at Gilman Street with Chain of Strength and Hard Stance that I noticed it. Before the show, the guys in Chain were going off about our demo and how much Ron’s voice sounded like Springa. Gilman had a pretty decent sound system, so that night while we were playing, I made sure to take notice of Ron’s voice and I was like ‘Yeah! Now I get it’.

ThatThat first out of state show was a dream show at Gilman Street with Amenity ,Chain of Strength, Hard Stance and No For An Answer. We were so psyched that we drove there through the night. Now, we hadn’t really perfected the Straight Edge look by then maybe. I remember we got to the show unshaven and looking ratty from driving through the night and we saw the Chain of Strength guys. They had high tops on and the whole look down, totally put together.  Ryan from Chain came up to me and the first thing he did was point at my Converse low-top Chuck Taylors and say ‘What’s up with your shoes?’ I said ‘I’m a vegetarian!’ His reply? ‘Dude, don’t take yourself so seriously’.

Another thing I remember about that time was it was so cool to get a letter from somebody. It took so long for that letter to come that you really digested it and you really digested whatever ‘zine or music they sent with it. And I hate to sound like an old man, but I think that sort of thing is entirely lost with everything being so immediate these days.

The Accused were a band that was very important to me. In 1985, I saw them open for a total cock rock Metal band and I could not believe the energy of the music they were putting forth. I saw my first circle pit. It was amazing and I became friendly with them back then. Then, 1989 I got a call from Tommy  from The Accused and he said ‘Hey, are you in that band Brotherhood?’ I told him yes and he said ‘Well, check it out: The Accused is going on tour and the guy booking our tour said to take you guys because Straight Edge is really popular now’. We said yes of course because those guys were our heroes from day one. The tour was a cool package because the Accused crowd dug us since we were so fired up and energetic and the Straight Edge kids who came to see us just ended up loving The Accused because they were such a great live band..

BROTHERHOOD IN BOSTON | PHOTO COURTESY OF : SOUTHERN LORD

BROTHERHOOD IN BOSTON | PHOTO COURTESY OF : SOUTHERN LORD

It was so cool to meet people because at that point, the only Straight Edge band that did any touring was Youth of Today. So for a Straight Edge Hardcore band like us to come and play Omaha, kids lost their minds. I mean, it was four dudes who lost their minds but it was the biggest deal in the world to them because all they had seen by that point was Youth of Today. It felt like some real pioneer shit!

Pretty soon after that, a band called Refuse became really close to Brotherhood. My first girlfriend, her little brother was Mark Holcomb. I went over her house and he was wearing a Cure shirt, so I thought ‘Hey, this kid should listen to D.R.I!’ So I turned him onto Hardcore and he really liked it. Then, I turned him onto the Straight Edge stuff and him and his friends really took to that. So, now we had another bunch of Straight Edge kids, little kids, from our neighborhood. We helped them as much as we could when they were Refuse. The name change from Refuse to Undertow came after Brotherhood, because I’m pretty sure they named themselves after the Inside Out song.

The funny thing about Refuse is if it wasn’t for Mark Holcomb, I wouldn’t have met Steve O’Malley, someone who I’ve played a lot of music with for many, many years now! He was friends with Mark. I remember seeing Mark and Joel walking down the street one day and they were walking with this dude with really long hair and since this was the height of Straight Edge, I was like ‘Who’s this guy?’ and they were like ‘Oh this is our friend, Rocker Steve’ Steve turned me onto Metal that was going on at that time and I turned him onto music I was into.   So, in some weird way, you can say their wouldn’t have been a Sunn O))) or me collaborating with Julian Cope or  Scott Walker if it wasn’t for Refuse! 

BROTHERHOOD SHOWING EVERYONE 'THE DEAL' | PHOTO COURTESY OF : SOUTHERN LORD

BROTHERHOOD SHOWING EVERYONE ‘THE DEAL’ | PHOTO COURTESY OF : SOUTHERN LORD

QUICKSAND – BOSTON, 11/4/1990
August 7th, 2014 by Tim