JOHN COYLE – OUTSPOKEN
March 17th, 2016 by Tim
JOHN COYLE WITH OUTSPOKEN AT THE ROXY, HOLLYWOOD, CA, 12/26/1991 | PHOTO: CHRIS TOLIVER

JOHN COYLE WITH OUTSPOKEN AT THE ROXY, HOLLYWOOD, CA, 12/26/1991 | PHOTO: CHRIS TOLIVER

We’ve been talking about getting John Coyle on board for an interview for quite awhile and with Outspoken playing this weekend’s Jon Bunch Memorial show, the timing worked out perfectly. So let’s get it started. – Tim DCXX

What was your first contact with punk/HC?

My first contact came from my neighbor. She was about 8 years older than me. She started off as the typical Southern California blonde beach girl and then she slowly started getting into punk. I always thought she was the coolest. She invited me over one day and played the Sex Pistols. That was it – I was hooked. I think I was about 13. Had she been listening to Simon and Garfunkel I probably would have been into that because she was awesome. She later took me to LA and I was in one of her friend’s commercials for some hair studio.

 What hardcore records made an immediate impression early on for you?

The day I heard Black Flag’s ‘Damaged’ my life changed. Back in school I used to get into a lot of fights, the older kids used to give me trouble for being different. I used to carry all of my school books in my backpack to every class so as soon as school got out I could get home before any trouble started. One day my teacher held me back and when I started on my way home a group of kids followed me. I ducked into a Taco Bell and this one kid that went to my school that was always quiet was sitting in the back of the restaurant listening to Damaged on a ghetto blaster. The other kids showed up and were yelling shit through the windows until the Taco Bell manager called the cops. I begged to borrow the Black Flag tape and I rode my skateboard home listening to what would become my life’s bible on a yellow Sony Walkman.

Black Flag’s Damaged changed my DNA. I ended up going to school the next day and got into a fight with them and I never ran again. I remember to this day the kid walked up and pushed me and the feedback and intro to Rise Above started playing in my head and I went off. That record and that moment was a major turning point in my life. Music clearly became something that was a comfort and gave me confidence. It always told me “you’re not fucked up, you’re ok.” That was the big draw to going to Fenders. It was the one place you just felt accepted and ok no matter how crazy the place was. Years later I remember walking to high school listening to Scream’s Walking By Myself on constant repeat on the same Walkman.

OUTSPOKEN AT CLUB 8 1/2, FULLERTON, CA, 12/10/1993 | PHOTO: FORREST LOCKE

OUTSPOKEN AT CLUB 8 1/2, FULLERTON, CA, 12/10/1993 | PHOTO: FORREST LOCKE

What was the first live show (punk/HC) you saw and what type of an impact did it have on you?

My brother took me to see Social Distortion and Siouxsie and the Banshees at  the Palladium, if I recall correctly. I was little and all of the older punks thought I was awesome so I loved it. I had a shaved head at the time and everyone would walk by me and rub my head. Odd that I remember that. It was the first time I felt comfortable like I was where I belonged, and I loved that it seemed dangerous.

My first real Hardcore show was Seven Seconds and Youth Brigade at Fenders Ballroom in Long Beach. That place was heavy. My first three or so shows I think I stood in the back and didn’t look at anyone. After a while I moved up towards the stage and being the little guy I would get picked up and put on someone’s shoulders and run around the pit. Being little had its advantages as no one really f’d with you. Looking back those were the best hardcore days. I was really into Black Flag, Wasted Youth, Raw Power (from Italy), RKL, Aggression, RKL, SNFU etc. Fenders had a huge impact. We went every weekend regardless of who was playing. We were at a Poison Idea show once and I turned around and my brother was about to get into it with some gang guys, I ran over to help and the dudes from Poison Idea ran from behind this little “backstage” area and dragged us back there. They were telling us how gnarly Fenders was and they were freaking out. I looked at my brother and we were both shocked because to us the dudes in Poison Idea were heavy. They told us their scene was nothing like this. We enjoyed some of the show from “backstage” then returned to general population.

OUTSPOKEN AT JIM'S GARAGE, LA VERNE, CA, 02/10/1990 | PHOTO: KENT MCCLARD

OUTSPOKEN AT JIM’S GARAGE, LA VERNE, CA, 02/10/1990 | PHOTO: KENT MCCLARD

Where exactly did you grow up and who were your early friends in the HC scene?

I grew up in Huntington Beach, I started going to shows with my brother, then we started a band called Back to Back with Regis from Chorus. We were hanging out with Half Off, Insted, Hard Stance, Freewill, Walk Proud, Justice League. It was a great scene then and all of the bands hung out and supported each other.

A few funny stories… the first time I saw Insted was at a backyard party, in Anaheim. I think their demo had just come out. Man I loved that demo. When Insted recorded their first record I remember being realIy bummed about not being asked to sing back-ups. Kevin sees me at a show and all he said was wait until you hear our record… Dano hooked you guys up. When I heard it and Dan yells “Back to Back” on Proud Youth I lost my shit.

Hard Stance was playing a benefit concert in Irvine and I was an idiot and snuck in and Zack was screaming at me for being an entitled Orange County F-head that snuck into a benefit. He was totally right. Hard Stance was amazing. I used to go over to Dubar’s house to buy Wishingwell stuff all the time. I think 90 percent of my wardrobe at the time came from Wishingwell. Shirts, sweatpants, sweatshirts, you name it. My wall was wallpapered in Uniform Choice posters. One day I cruise over and they are having a party, the house is full of people and Pat’s sitting in a chair leaning against the wall in nothing but black running shorts ala Rollins. It was classic.

Dubar was the heaviest and coolest of anyone from OC back then. At one show someone threw a burrito at him and hit him in the face. Dubar yells into the mic ”who threw that?!” and then just dove into the crowd swinging at a group of guys in that general direction. He always looked after everyone. 

Although the moment I met Dennis Remsing all bets were off, him and I were thick as thieves. I loved the guy and still do…

OUTSPOKEN AT THE ROXY, HOLLYWOOD, CA, 12/26/1991 | PHOTO: CHRIS TOLIVER

OUTSPOKEN AT THE ROXY, HOLLYWOOD, CA, 12/26/1991 | PHOTO: CHRIS TOLIVER

MOUTHPIECE LIVE IN PHILADELPHIA, 03.04.2016
March 14th, 2016 by Tim

Mouthpiece (Full Set) from hate5six on Vimeo.

I try to make it a point to not post too much on DCXX about my own personal bands, but every once in awhile I’ll make an exception. Last weekend’s show at the Underground Arts in Philadelphia was a special one. Having American Nightmare and Burn invite us to join them was quite an honor. It was also an honor to play with such great, up and coming bands like Freedom, Red Death and Free. Huge thanks goes out to Joe Hardcore and everything he does, not just for the Philadelphia hardcore scene, but the entire east coast hardcore scene. This guy really knows how to do things right for both the bands and the fans and it’s all very much appreciated. Having done this band for 26 years, on and off, I do not take for granted these opportunities to do what I love. I really thank each and everyone of you that have supported, come up front, watched from the back, sang along, bought a record, bought a t shirt, did a stage dive and gave this band any ounce of respect. Like I said, March 5, 2016 was a special night, I’m glad this video exists to document it. What it means, what it meant, nothing’s changed in me. – Tim DCXX

BURN LIVE IN PHILADELPHIA, 03.04.2016
March 8th, 2016 by Ed

Burn (Full Set) from hate5six on Vimeo.

Burn
March 4, 2016
Underground Arts
Philadelphia, PA

CHARLIE GARRIGA INTERVIEW: PART 2
March 3rd, 2016 by Larry
CHARLIE, BILLY GILL, ???, ROB GILMORE (RIP), MARK KONOPKA, MIKE JONES, MISH G. - POST SKATE SESSION HANG OUTS | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

CHARLIE, MICHELE GARRIGA, ROB GILMORE (RIP), MARK KONOPKA, MIKE JONES – POST SKATE SESSION HANG OUTS | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

Here’s part 2 of our interview with Charlie. Take it away…

What were the first punk/HC records you heard and what can you recall about those experiences?

I remember listening to Minor Threat and just being blown away by the intensity that was communicated through the music. At the time I just wasn’t into drinking and didn’t think much of it. I just thought it was a waste of time and money. I didn’t really realize I was being straight edge. I drank a couple beers in seventh and eighth grade in friends basements that had older brothers that got the beers and smoked a couple of cigarettes to act cool but was always afraid to try drugs. So I guess that was a good thing. I experimented young and got it out of my system. Once I realized that Ian was singing about straight edge, I thought that’s pretty cool. That’s like me. When I heard Uniform Choice, I was like wow they sound like Minor Threat and they are really pushing this whole no drugs and booze message. Also, they were a new band and I could actually see them play. I got my black Uniform Choice shirt and wore it out. Then it seemed like other people were gravitating towards straight edge. I heard about Youth Of Today and finally heard Break Down The Walls and I thought “Wow, this is some positive shit!” I was totally into 7 Seconds by then and Bad Brains so I was already into positivity and unity.

No one I had heard yet had lyrics like that so I was all in. We drove to Toledo, Ohio to see Youth Of Today. The line up was Ray, Porcell, Richie, Mike Judge on drums and Walter had just joined the band. It might have been his first show. They were amazing. We went to Detroit the next night and it was even better. Civ was was of the roadies on that tour. It’s a long story but basically there were a lot of white power skins in Detroit back then. I am talking big ass scary swastika tattooed white power skins. So of course they were talking their shit and Ray got right in their faces. Pretty sure there was a scuffle that night and we hung out with the Youth Of Today guys after the melee. So now they knew us as the Cleveland crew.

WALTER, PORCELL & RAY WITH YOUTH OF TODAY IN TOLEDO, OHIO - SUMMER 1987 | PHOTO: CHARLIE GARRIGA

WALTER, PORCELL & RAY WITH YOUTH OF TODAY IN TOLEDO, OHIO – SUMMER 1987 | PHOTO: CHARLIE GARRIGA

How did Outface form? How did everyone come together?

Around that time we were like, “We should start a band.” We basically told our friend Mark Konopka he was going to play drums so he should go get some drums. I met Frank Cavanaugh in high school because he was one of the misfits that rode the bus with me. He looked kind of goth but was into punk and eventually hardcore bands. He did have Bauhaus on his jean jacket. Haha. He had a bass guitar so it was on. At the time Dag Nasty Can I Say was my favorite record. I basically wanted to sound like that. We got our equipment set up in my basement and we were ready to rock. We were pretty bad for a while. Our girlfriends would come over after school and watch us practice so that was cool. We were called OUTFACE. We did sound like a D.C. band. Not a good one but we were feeling that sound. The more we played the better we got. We had two singers before we asked Derrick Green to be the guy. He was totally into it and brought a different style to the songs we had. It was like a whole new band. Also, our drummer who had the least amount of experience was probably the best musician of the band.

Over time we would see Youth Of Today and Gorilla Biscuits and other New York City bands and once they knew we had a band, they would put us on shows. I would say Verbal Assault was also a huge influence on the early OUTFACE sound. Trial is one of my all time favorites. Pete Chramiec was a big influence on my guitar playing at the time. My biggest influence on guitar was Brian Baker. I saw Dag Nasty on the Wig Out tour and his sound and style blew me away. I met him through a friend in Detroit and he was really cool. He also put OUTFACE on as an opener for a Dag Nasty show in Columbus, Ohio. That was a big deal for me and the band. I wish I could have seen them with Dave Smalley but I would take what I could get. It was so cool to have a band and be able to play with your favorite bands. We didn’t make any money and we blew two engines in my Dad’s vans but it was worth it. We were playing with Gorilla Biscuits, Youth Of Today, Judge, Verbal Assault, Underdog, S.N.F.U., Murphy’s Law, Warzone and headlining shows in Cleveland, Buffalo, Syracuse, Erie and did a small headline tour in Florida around 1990.

VERY EARLY OUTFACE PRACTICE IN CHARLIE'S BASEMENT | PHOTO:  ANN WARMUTH

VERY EARLY OUTFACE PRACTICE IN CHARLIE’S BASEMENT | PHOTO: ANN WARMUTH

Cleveland was one of the first ‘militant’ straight edge scenes of the late 1980s. What did you make of that?

The straight edge movement became really big in Cleveland as well as Buffalo and Syracuse. I think the fact that all the Revelation bands like Youth Of Today, Judge and Chain Of Strength always played there when they toured had a huge impact. I guess it did become somewhat militant for a while in Cleveland. I guess Dwid from Integrity had a lot to do with that. He actually did carry a bag with baseball bats in it to beat down people. He actually lived in my house for a little while. That was when he started Die Hard which eventually led to Integrity. The band Confront was also a legendary straight edge band. They were great and very much influenced by Youth Of Today. There were times where I was caught in the middle of the scene. I was straight edge but never wore an X on my hand. I didn’t feel like I had to announce it or make it a big deal. It seemed too easy for kids to X up at a show to fit in and then a month later they weren’t into it and getting wasted.

There were times when Dwid wanted to beat up some punks or older guys at shows for drinking and no other reason. The problem was at that point I was friends with a lot of the older guys and skated with the drunk punks and they were cool guys. There was a group of guys from the west side called The GGs. They basically worshiped GG Allin. The funny thing was they were sick skaters so I used to go skate with them all. Here’s the funny thing… Once Dwid beat a few of them up, they still came to shows and hung out. He eventually became friends with them and started acting like them. Doing gross GG like stuff and getting fucked up so all the Dwid followers didn’t know what to do. Some followed and some didn’t. I remained my positive self. Haha.

OUTFACE OPENING FOR SNFU | PHOTO:  STEVE WAINSTEAD

OUTFACE OPENING FOR SNFU | PHOTO: STEVE WAINSTEAD

PART 3 with Charlie – coming soon.

Missed part 1? Click HERE to get caught up.

MIRACLE DRUG
March 1st, 2016 by Ed
MATT LAYS DOWN THE HEAVY RIFFAGE | PHOTO: ERRICK EASTERDAILY

MATT LAYS DOWN THE HEAVY RIFFAGE | PHOTO: ERRICK EASTERDAILY

Right here. Right now. Louisville, KY’s Miracle Drug prefer to live in the present, existing in the moment, channeling the experiences of the past through the energy and excitement of the future. It should come as no surprise that there is an odd familiarity in Miracle Drug’s sound. The band is made up of current and former members of notable hardcore acts Mouthpiece, Supertouch, By The Grace of God, and C.R. The band’s demo, recorded at Treehouse audio by Trip Barringer (White Reaper, Black God), is a 12 minute blast of blistering, metallic tinged hardcore that would be right at home blasting through the PA of any sweaty DIY venue in the country.

Miracle Drug’s demo is coming out on Vinyl this year on Trip Machine Labs (All Out War, Atlas Shrugged.) Check it out below:

MIRACLE DRUG TAKES A SEAT | PHOTO:  ROXY PHILLIPS

MIRACLE DRUG TAKES A SEAT | PHOTO: ROXY PHILLIPS

MIRACLE DRUG’S OFFICIAL FACEBOOK

INSTED LIVE AT FENDERS (BONDS OF FRIENDSHIP LINEUP)
March 1st, 2016 by Tim

JUDGE LIVE AT VOLTAGE LOUNGE, PHILADELPHIA PA, 2/19/2016
February 24th, 2016 by Tim

Judge (Full Set) from hate5six on Vimeo.

THE NEW YORK HARDCORE CHRONICLES WITH CIV
February 22nd, 2016 by Tim

JON BUNCH MEMORIAL CONCERT
February 14th, 2016 by Tim

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Jon Bunch Memorial Concert – March 20th at the Yost Theatre 307 N. Spurgeon St., Santa Ana CA 92701 with three stages featuring
Sense Field with special guest vocalists Richie Birkenhead-Garrett Klahn-Kenny Vasoli-Popeye-Jeff Caudill-Walter Schreifels-Sam Velde-Zoli Teglas-Matt Bronx-Jonah Matranga

Bands included are:
Texas is the Reason
The Bronx
Into Another
Samiam
Gameface
Knapsack
Lidsville

Reason to Believe stage
Outspoken (original members)
Strife
Mean Season
No For An Answer (You Laugh lineup)
Visual Discrimination
Justice League
Freewill

Lucky Scars stage
Death by stereo
Longfellow
Done Dying
Blood Days
Sex Powers

Plus many more to be added.

CHARLIE GARRIGA INTERVIEW: PART 1
February 11th, 2016 by Larry
CHARLIE WITH JUDGE AT IEPERFEST IN IEPER, BELGIUM | PHOTO: AGA HAIRESIS

CHARLIE WITH JUDGE AT IEPERFEST IN IEPER, BELGIUM | PHOTO: AGA HAIRESIS

I’ve been working on this interview with Charlie for awhile now and I am happy to finally be able to present part one to you. Lots more to come! – Larry

Where exactly did you grow up and what music led you towards punk and hardcore? What early records had an impact on you and when did you first hear them?

I grew up in Cleveland, Ohio. My father was from East Cleveland and my mother came over as a nanny from England in the 1960s. My mom had a great record collection. All the Beatles records, Rolling Stones and other cool 60s and 70s records. My dad also had a pretty bad ass eight track tape collection. Some of my earliest memories were putting records on the record player. I remember going to visit my family in England when I was pretty young, maybe 10 years old and my cousin was a Mod. I remember her talking about how much she wanted a Vespa. I thought she was so cool. She turned me onto The Clash, The Jam and Public Image to name a few. She gave me a 7″ that had This Is Not A Love Song on one side and Public Image on the other side. I wish I still had that. I remember when we went to Piccadilly Circus and saw the punks hanging out and I thought they were cool. They yelled at you if you tried to take their picture. You had to give them a few pounds and pents and they still told you to piss off. It was great.

Right around that time MTV started and my sister and I got into Adam And The Ants and the other bands that we thought looked punk. So pretty much through the 1980s I was into new wave and The Clash. I was also into Hip Hop from its early stages. I had Kurtis Blow “The Breaks” on a 45 and got really into RUN DMC and LL Cool J. Of course I used to break dance with friends in my neighborhood but I was also into Van Halen. We had the first album on eight track and I listened to it all the time. I was really into everything.

Once I got into high school in 1985 I really was leaning towards alternative and punk music. I was into BMX racing and eventually got way more into skateboarding. I think that opened me up to what would eventually be hardcore music. I remember skating with the older guys and hearing Black Flag, Minor Threat, Circle Jerks and Suicidal Tendencies… I think that’s when I started considering myself punk. I went to an all boys catholic high school that was about a 45 minute bus ride there and back every day. I became friends with a kid named George Milton and he really got me more into punk music. He had a lot of vinyl. I remember listening to the Germs and seeing that first Suicidal album. I thought it was so crazy and cool. He was also friends with these older dudes that had a band called Civilian Terrorists. I heard their demo tape and they were awesome. I couldn’t believe George was friends with them. I am pretty sure they were one of the first shows I went to. I cant remember if was at The Cleveland Underground or a place called JBs in Kent Ohio. Either way I was really young and pretty scared when I saw the people hanging out and slam dancing but I couldn’t wait to do it again. I met the guys in Civilian Terrorists and saw them open for Suicidal Tendencies at the Variety Theater. I had my home made Suicidal white button down like the ones I saw on the sleeve of the album. It was mind blowing to see them play those songs and it sounded just like the record. That’s one of my earliest show memories.

I also saw Agnostic Front and Negative Approach play a Knights Of Columbus Hall in ’85-’86. There was bunch of skinheads and really punk people. There was probably 40 people there but it seemed so crazy and Agnostic Front was just scary to a 80 pound skate rat like myself. Haha. That was terrifying but once again I was drawn to it. After that I would pretty much go to every show I could. I would have to get a ride and pitch in for gas but where there was a will there was a way. Going to JBs in Kent was always a risk because it was far and the shows weren’t all ages so sometimes they were strict and you wouldn’t get in so we would just skate outside and listen to the bands.

CHARLIE AND FRIEND, MARK KONOPKA, DOUBLES IN A BACKYARD POOL IN OHIO | PHOTO: ANN WARMUTH

CHARLIE AND FRIEND AND OUTFACE DRUMMER, MARK KONOPKA; DOUBLES IN A BACKYARD POOL IN OHIO | PHOTO: ANN WARMUTH

When did you start playing guitar and what were your early influences?

I don’t remember really asking for a guitar. My dad had an old acoustic and we had a piano in my house but one year my parents got this cheap ass guitar and a cable that plugged into our stereo. The cool thing was I could play the eight track tapes on the stereo and play the guitar along with them. It sounded like shit but it was fun. I had a friend down the street that would tune the guitar and taught me a basic bar chord. I would sit in my basement and try to play along with Van Halen. That wasn’t good but I would play along to the first Cars album and that started to sound good because it was basic rock n roll. My buddy George had a guitar and an amp that sounded great because he had a distortion pedal so he would figure out some songs and show me how to play them. To this day I can’t read music. I never learned. I have always played by ear. I never took a proper guitar lesson. Early on I figured I wanted to play what I wanted to play and didn’t want to waste time learning Stairway To Heaven. Subliminal by Suicidal Tendencies was one of the first songs I remember being excited about playing. I could also could rip Just What I Needed by The Cars. Haha.

CHARLIE AT AN EARLY OUTFACE PRACTICE | PHOTO: ????

CHARLIE AT AN EARLY OUTFACE PRACTICE | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

What was the hardcore punk scene like where you lived and what were some of your early encounters?

One day my buddy George got a hold of the Cro-Mags demo from Jim, the singer of Civilian Terrorists. He was like you have to come over and listen to this band. So I did. Annnnd. Wow. Mind was blown. He said they were going to open for G.B.H. at Peabodys Down Under. I can’t even tell you how many amazing shows I saw at Peabody’s. Honestly too many to name. Also I loved G.B.H. so I was psyched for the show. Let’s just say I felt bad for G.B.H. having to follow the hardcore onslaught that the Cro-Mags brought that night. Anyone that was there will tell you the same. They were on fire. So they became one of my favorite bands right then and there.

TO BE CONTINUED IN PART TWO – COMING SOON

Be sure to see Charlie playing with the almighty JUDGE this month…

February 18 – Buffalo, N.Y. @ Waiting Room
February 19 – Philadelphia, PA. @ Voltage Lounge
February 20 – Boston, MA. @ Hardcore Stadium