JUDGE – “THE STORM” AT SO36
April 17th, 2016 by Tim

CHARLIE GARRIGA INTERVIEW: PART 2
March 3rd, 2016 by Larry
CHARLIE, BILLY GILL, ???, ROB GILMORE (RIP), MARK KONOPKA, MIKE JONES, MISH G. - POST SKATE SESSION HANG OUTS | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

CHARLIE, MICHELE GARRIGA, ROB GILMORE (RIP), MARK KONOPKA, MIKE JONES – POST SKATE SESSION HANG OUTS | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

Here’s part 2 of our interview with Charlie. Take it away…

What were the first punk/HC records you heard and what can you recall about those experiences?

I remember listening to Minor Threat and just being blown away by the intensity that was communicated through the music. At the time I just wasn’t into drinking and didn’t think much of it. I just thought it was a waste of time and money. I didn’t really realize I was being straight edge. I drank a couple beers in seventh and eighth grade in friends basements that had older brothers that got the beers and smoked a couple of cigarettes to act cool but was always afraid to try drugs. So I guess that was a good thing. I experimented young and got it out of my system. Once I realized that Ian was singing about straight edge, I thought that’s pretty cool. That’s like me. When I heard Uniform Choice, I was like wow they sound like Minor Threat and they are really pushing this whole no drugs and booze message. Also, they were a new band and I could actually see them play. I got my black Uniform Choice shirt and wore it out. Then it seemed like other people were gravitating towards straight edge. I heard about Youth Of Today and finally heard Break Down The Walls and I thought “Wow, this is some positive shit!” I was totally into 7 Seconds by then and Bad Brains so I was already into positivity and unity.

No one I had heard yet had lyrics like that so I was all in. We drove to Toledo, Ohio to see Youth Of Today. The line up was Ray, Porcell, Richie, Mike Judge on drums and Walter had just joined the band. It might have been his first show. They were amazing. We went to Detroit the next night and it was even better. Civ was was of the roadies on that tour. It’s a long story but basically there were a lot of white power skins in Detroit back then. I am talking big ass scary swastika tattooed white power skins. So of course they were talking their shit and Ray got right in their faces. Pretty sure there was a scuffle that night and we hung out with the Youth Of Today guys after the melee. So now they knew us as the Cleveland crew.

WALTER, PORCELL & RAY WITH YOUTH OF TODAY IN TOLEDO, OHIO - SUMMER 1987 | PHOTO: CHARLIE GARRIGA

WALTER, PORCELL & RAY WITH YOUTH OF TODAY IN TOLEDO, OHIO – SUMMER 1987 | PHOTO: CHARLIE GARRIGA

How did Outface form? How did everyone come together?

Around that time we were like, “We should start a band.” We basically told our friend Mark Konopka he was going to play drums so he should go get some drums. I met Frank Cavanaugh in high school because he was one of the misfits that rode the bus with me. He looked kind of goth but was into punk and eventually hardcore bands. He did have Bauhaus on his jean jacket. Haha. He had a bass guitar so it was on. At the time Dag Nasty Can I Say was my favorite record. I basically wanted to sound like that. We got our equipment set up in my basement and we were ready to rock. We were pretty bad for a while. Our girlfriends would come over after school and watch us practice so that was cool. We were called OUTFACE. We did sound like a D.C. band. Not a good one but we were feeling that sound. The more we played the better we got. We had two singers before we asked Derrick Green to be the guy. He was totally into it and brought a different style to the songs we had. It was like a whole new band. Also, our drummer who had the least amount of experience was probably the best musician of the band.

Over time we would see Youth Of Today and Gorilla Biscuits and other New York City bands and once they knew we had a band, they would put us on shows. I would say Verbal Assault was also a huge influence on the early OUTFACE sound. Trial is one of my all time favorites. Pete Chramiec was a big influence on my guitar playing at the time. My biggest influence on guitar was Brian Baker. I saw Dag Nasty on the Wig Out tour and his sound and style blew me away. I met him through a friend in Detroit and he was really cool. He also put OUTFACE on as an opener for a Dag Nasty show in Columbus, Ohio. That was a big deal for me and the band. I wish I could have seen them with Dave Smalley but I would take what I could get. It was so cool to have a band and be able to play with your favorite bands. We didn’t make any money and we blew two engines in my Dad’s vans but it was worth it. We were playing with Gorilla Biscuits, Youth Of Today, Judge, Verbal Assault, Underdog, S.N.F.U., Murphy’s Law, Warzone and headlining shows in Cleveland, Buffalo, Syracuse, Erie and did a small headline tour in Florida around 1990.

VERY EARLY OUTFACE PRACTICE IN CHARLIE'S BASEMENT | PHOTO:  ANN WARMUTH

VERY EARLY OUTFACE PRACTICE IN CHARLIE’S BASEMENT | PHOTO: ANN WARMUTH

Cleveland was one of the first ‘militant’ straight edge scenes of the late 1980s. What did you make of that?

The straight edge movement became really big in Cleveland as well as Buffalo and Syracuse. I think the fact that all the Revelation bands like Youth Of Today, Judge and Chain Of Strength always played there when they toured had a huge impact. I guess it did become somewhat militant for a while in Cleveland. I guess Dwid from Integrity had a lot to do with that. He actually did carry a bag with baseball bats in it to beat down people. He actually lived in my house for a little while. That was when he started Die Hard which eventually led to Integrity. The band Confront was also a legendary straight edge band. They were great and very much influenced by Youth Of Today. There were times where I was caught in the middle of the scene. I was straight edge but never wore an X on my hand. I didn’t feel like I had to announce it or make it a big deal. It seemed too easy for kids to X up at a show to fit in and then a month later they weren’t into it and getting wasted.

There were times when Dwid wanted to beat up some punks or older guys at shows for drinking and no other reason. The problem was at that point I was friends with a lot of the older guys and skated with the drunk punks and they were cool guys. There was a group of guys from the west side called The GGs. They basically worshiped GG Allin. The funny thing was they were sick skaters so I used to go skate with them all. Here’s the funny thing… Once Dwid beat a few of them up, they still came to shows and hung out. He eventually became friends with them and started acting like them. Doing gross GG like stuff and getting fucked up so all the Dwid followers didn’t know what to do. Some followed and some didn’t. I remained my positive self. Haha.

OUTFACE OPENING FOR SNFU | PHOTO:  STEVE WAINSTEAD

OUTFACE OPENING FOR SNFU | PHOTO: STEVE WAINSTEAD

PART 3 with Charlie – coming soon.

Missed part 1? Click HERE to get caught up.

JUDGE LIVE AT VOLTAGE LOUNGE, PHILADELPHIA PA, 2/19/2016
February 24th, 2016 by Tim

Judge (Full Set) from hate5six on Vimeo.

CHARLIE GARRIGA INTERVIEW: PART 1
February 11th, 2016 by Larry
CHARLIE WITH JUDGE AT IEPERFEST IN IEPER, BELGIUM | PHOTO: AGA HAIRESIS

CHARLIE WITH JUDGE AT IEPERFEST IN IEPER, BELGIUM | PHOTO: AGA HAIRESIS

I’ve been working on this interview with Charlie for awhile now and I am happy to finally be able to present part one to you. Lots more to come! – Larry

Where exactly did you grow up and what music led you towards punk and hardcore? What early records had an impact on you and when did you first hear them?

I grew up in Cleveland, Ohio. My father was from East Cleveland and my mother came over as a nanny from England in the 1960s. My mom had a great record collection. All the Beatles records, Rolling Stones and other cool 60s and 70s records. My dad also had a pretty bad ass eight track tape collection. Some of my earliest memories were putting records on the record player. I remember going to visit my family in England when I was pretty young, maybe 10 years old and my cousin was a Mod. I remember her talking about how much she wanted a Vespa. I thought she was so cool. She turned me onto The Clash, The Jam and Public Image to name a few. She gave me a 7″ that had This Is Not A Love Song on one side and Public Image on the other side. I wish I still had that. I remember when we went to Piccadilly Circus and saw the punks hanging out and I thought they were cool. They yelled at you if you tried to take their picture. You had to give them a few pounds and pents and they still told you to piss off. It was great.

Right around that time MTV started and my sister and I got into Adam And The Ants and the other bands that we thought looked punk. So pretty much through the 1980s I was into new wave and The Clash. I was also into Hip Hop from its early stages. I had Kurtis Blow “The Breaks” on a 45 and got really into RUN DMC and LL Cool J. Of course I used to break dance with friends in my neighborhood but I was also into Van Halen. We had the first album on eight track and I listened to it all the time. I was really into everything.

Once I got into high school in 1985 I really was leaning towards alternative and punk music. I was into BMX racing and eventually got way more into skateboarding. I think that opened me up to what would eventually be hardcore music. I remember skating with the older guys and hearing Black Flag, Minor Threat, Circle Jerks and Suicidal Tendencies… I think that’s when I started considering myself punk. I went to an all boys catholic high school that was about a 45 minute bus ride there and back every day. I became friends with a kid named George Milton and he really got me more into punk music. He had a lot of vinyl. I remember listening to the Germs and seeing that first Suicidal album. I thought it was so crazy and cool. He was also friends with these older dudes that had a band called Civilian Terrorists. I heard their demo tape and they were awesome. I couldn’t believe George was friends with them. I am pretty sure they were one of the first shows I went to. I cant remember if was at The Cleveland Underground or a place called JBs in Kent Ohio. Either way I was really young and pretty scared when I saw the people hanging out and slam dancing but I couldn’t wait to do it again. I met the guys in Civilian Terrorists and saw them open for Suicidal Tendencies at the Variety Theater. I had my home made Suicidal white button down like the ones I saw on the sleeve of the album. It was mind blowing to see them play those songs and it sounded just like the record. That’s one of my earliest show memories.

I also saw Agnostic Front and Negative Approach play a Knights Of Columbus Hall in ’85-’86. There was bunch of skinheads and really punk people. There was probably 40 people there but it seemed so crazy and Agnostic Front was just scary to a 80 pound skate rat like myself. Haha. That was terrifying but once again I was drawn to it. After that I would pretty much go to every show I could. I would have to get a ride and pitch in for gas but where there was a will there was a way. Going to JBs in Kent was always a risk because it was far and the shows weren’t all ages so sometimes they were strict and you wouldn’t get in so we would just skate outside and listen to the bands.

CHARLIE AND FRIEND, MARK KONOPKA, DOUBLES IN A BACKYARD POOL IN OHIO | PHOTO: ANN WARMUTH

CHARLIE AND FRIEND AND OUTFACE DRUMMER, MARK KONOPKA; DOUBLES IN A BACKYARD POOL IN OHIO | PHOTO: ANN WARMUTH

When did you start playing guitar and what were your early influences?

I don’t remember really asking for a guitar. My dad had an old acoustic and we had a piano in my house but one year my parents got this cheap ass guitar and a cable that plugged into our stereo. The cool thing was I could play the eight track tapes on the stereo and play the guitar along with them. It sounded like shit but it was fun. I had a friend down the street that would tune the guitar and taught me a basic bar chord. I would sit in my basement and try to play along with Van Halen. That wasn’t good but I would play along to the first Cars album and that started to sound good because it was basic rock n roll. My buddy George had a guitar and an amp that sounded great because he had a distortion pedal so he would figure out some songs and show me how to play them. To this day I can’t read music. I never learned. I have always played by ear. I never took a proper guitar lesson. Early on I figured I wanted to play what I wanted to play and didn’t want to waste time learning Stairway To Heaven. Subliminal by Suicidal Tendencies was one of the first songs I remember being excited about playing. I could also could rip Just What I Needed by The Cars. Haha.

CHARLIE AT AN EARLY OUTFACE PRACTICE | PHOTO: ????

CHARLIE AT AN EARLY OUTFACE PRACTICE | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

What was the hardcore punk scene like where you lived and what were some of your early encounters?

One day my buddy George got a hold of the Cro-Mags demo from Jim, the singer of Civilian Terrorists. He was like you have to come over and listen to this band. So I did. Annnnd. Wow. Mind was blown. He said they were going to open for G.B.H. at Peabodys Down Under. I can’t even tell you how many amazing shows I saw at Peabody’s. Honestly too many to name. Also I loved G.B.H. so I was psyched for the show. Let’s just say I felt bad for G.B.H. having to follow the hardcore onslaught that the Cro-Mags brought that night. Anyone that was there will tell you the same. They were on fire. So they became one of my favorite bands right then and there.

TO BE CONTINUED IN PART TWO – COMING SOON

Be sure to see Charlie playing with the almighty JUDGE this month…

February 18 – Buffalo, N.Y. @ Waiting Room
February 19 – Philadelphia, PA. @ Voltage Lounge
February 20 – Boston, MA. @ Hardcore Stadium

THE NEW YORK HARDCORE CHRONICLES WITH PORCELL
January 22nd, 2016 by Tim

THE NEW YORK HARDCORE CHRONICLES 1979-2015
November 24th, 2015 by Tim

Drew Stone delivers a couple new interview snippets from his upcoming documentary, The New York Hardcore Chronicles 1979-2015.

JUDGE – “BRINGIN’ IT DOWN” 25TH ANNIVERSARY
November 12th, 2015 by Tim

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STORMING THROUGH EUROPE 2015
July 21st, 2015 by Tim

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JUDGE LIVE AT RAIN FEST, SEATTLE WA. – 5/24/2015
May 27th, 2015 by Tim

The DCXX crew took a trip to Seattle for this year’s Rain Fest and a great time was had by all. Here’s a video shot by Mike Medina of Judge’s set, which was definitely one of the highlights of the weekend. Mike Medina missed a chunk of Judge’s opening song, “Fed Up”, but the rest is here in all it’s glory. My apologies to Mike Judge for the swift kick to the back of his head during “New York Crew”. Mike told me after the set that he hadn’t taken a hit like that since the A7 days. Once again, sorry Mike! Also included here are a few great shots courtesy of Future Breed. -Tim DCXX

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MIKE WITH JUDGE AT RAIN FEST | PHOTO: FUTURE BREED

MATT WITH JUDGE AT RAIN FEST | PHOTO: FUTURE BREED

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PORCELL WITH JUDGE AT RAIN FEST | PHOTO: FUTURE BREED

JUDGE, GIJIS AND THE DCXX CREW POST JUDGE SET | PHOTO: KAREN FERRARO

JUDGE, GIJIS AND THE DCXX CREW POST JUDGE SET | PHOTO: KAREN FERRARO

THERE WILL BE QUIET: THE STORY OF JUDGE (PART 4)
April 29th, 2015 by Tim