REALITY RECORDS ANNOUNCES LEEWAY DISCOGRAPHY RE-RELEASES
January 22nd, 2015 by Tim

leeway

In our 15 years history as a label we are exultant that we can announce the following news:

We’re going to re-release the 4 LEEWAY full lengths on Reality Records!

LEEWAY brought us some of the best crossover / thrash / hardcore ever written and is still a big influence to a lot of current and new bands in our scene! These albums were long out of print and deserve the right sound! ‘Born To Expire’ & ‘Desperate Measures’ can be considered as milestones in the hardcore history worlwide, while ‘Adult Crash’ and ‘Open Mouth Kiss’ are just way to underrated!

All of them will be remastered, will come with an extensive booklet and on top of that, every album will contain loads of bonustracks!

The formats we’re offering: CD / LP / digital!
Expect ‘Born To Expire’ and ‘Desperate Measures’ to be released in spring 2015!
‘Adult Crash’ and ‘Open Mouth Kiss’ will be released later on this year around fall/winter 2015!

Check out this Reality Records Facebook

Check out this Reality Records

NYHC 1980 – 1990 – THE RAW INTERVIEWS – RAY CAPPO – PART I
January 20th, 2015 by Tony
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RAY CAPPO AND CRAIG AHEAD WITH YOUTH OF TODAY AT CBGB’S, NYC, 1986 | PHOTO: KATHLEEN TOBIN

First off, I would personally like to thank everyone who snagged a copy of ‘NYHC 1980 – 1990′. I am truly humbled by the response the book received. The demand for the book was so out of control in fact that the first printing dried up rather quickly and left some out in the cold in regards of getting a copy. But don’t fear! The second printing of ‘NYHC 1980 – 1990′ will be hitting the book store shelves in the next few weeks with added photos and much more.

To celebrate both the reaction to the first printing and the upcoming second printing, I decided to go back into the vaults and pull out another interview conducted for the book and throw it up here on DCXX. This time around, we have a lengthy interview with all around NYHC icon, Ray Cappo.

This interview will be split into several installments due to its length, but in this first part, Ray speaks about his introduction into the Hardcore scene and the formation and initial shows of his first band, Violent Children.

Enjoy — Tony

RAY CAPPO GOES FOR A DIVE AT THE ANTHRAX DURING BOLD, 1987 | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

RAY CAPPO GOES FOR A DIVE AT THE ANTHRAX DURING BOLD, 1987 | PHOTO: UNKNOWN

Truthfully, I didn’t even know anything was going on in Connecticut even though Connecticut had a very striving scene. I lived in Danbury which was an hour and fifteen minutes from New York City on the Metro North train. My parents were sort of New Yorkers and my brothers and sisters were all older and they lived in the city. I used to go to New York City on weekends and my parents were cool with it because they figured I’d stay with my brothers or sisters and everything would be cool. Little did they know! I would just say ‘I’m going to see some music this weekend’. I’d keep it pretty vague. They had no idea I was hanging out on the Lower East Side all weekend. My first real introduction was I liked alternative music. I wasn’t quite sure of what Hardcore was at that point. Then I stumbled into CBGB’s when the UK Subs were playing one night. The Young and The Useless were playing, which was guys from the Beastie Boys. Once I saw the Young and The Useless, I thought ‘These are kids that are my age. I can do this’.

Usually, growing up in a suburban American high school environment, if you’re in a band, you’re in a cover band; at least back when I was growing up. Kids were playing the best of AC/DC, the best of Rush, the best of Journey. I always thought that was so lame. So when I saw these bands that weren’t technically good, but playing from their heart in some random nightclub, I thought it was the coolest thing ever.

I was with a girlfriend at the time and she goes ‘Ray, you could do this! You should start a band!’ So when I got back to my typical American high school, I grabbed three of my friends who were the only three guys into alternative music and said ‘Let’s start a band’. That’s when we started the band Violent Children.

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RAY WITH THE STAGE MOSH DURING AGNOSTIC FRONT AT CBGB’S, NYC | PHOTO COURTESY OF: ALEXA POLI-SCHEIGERT

From then on, CBGB’s became my escape from my world. It was a great place. You could see incredible bands for three dollars. It was almost like walking into a comic book with super heroes and villains and characters that were bigger than life. That’s what the New York scene was like. The characters on the scene were bigger and more colorful than the black and white people in your high school. There was no Raybeez or Vinnie Stigma or Harley Flanagan in your high school. These guys were bigger than life. When you would go back to your high school on a Monday morning and try to explain the bands you saw or how you saw one guy hit another guy over the head with a beer bottle, people would ask ‘Where do you go where you see people hitting each other over the head with beer bottles?’ At that point in life, the only place you should be seeing something like that is in a movie.

In 1982, there were barely any records. The only bands from New York that had records out were the False Prophets, Kraut and The Misguided. The only places you could hear this stuff were on these late night college radio shows. In my hometown, was the Danbury State College radio station and there was a radio show where it would be a mix between Duran Duran or INXS or Men Without Hats or Oingo Boingo with stuff like Dead Kennedys or Flipper or Youth Brigade or Minor Threat. So we thought ‘Let’s make a demo tape and get it played on this radio station!’ We made this really shitty demo tape and then we went to this radio station at midnight and threw pebbles against the window and the guy opened the window and we were like ‘Hey! We’re in a Hardcore band!’ The guy was so psyched that Danbury, Connecticut had a Hardcore band. We asked him to play our demo and he actually played our demo. He was saying ‘We have Danbury Connecticut’s only Hardcore band Violent Children in the studio!’ It was so cool.

That night, we got two phone calls. One was the guy who owned the club The Anthrax, which wasn’t quite a club yet. He said they were doing a benefit to open the Anthrax and he wanted us to play. He explained how The Anthrax would be an art gallery and a band hangout place. We got our first gig from that radio show. Check out the lineup: Violent Children, CIA, Agnostic Front, Cause for Alarm, Hose, Reflex from Pain and Lost Generation. It was a big massive line-up. We couldn’t believe we were going to be playing with all our favorite bands. When you’re in high school and your favorite band is Aerosmith, you’re never going to play with them. But here we were, listening to these bands and we’re playing our first gig with them.The second phone call was from Johnny Stiff calling in from New York. He booked shows at A7 and CBGB’s and offered us a show. So, from being on one radio show, we went from being a local band to getting out of state gigs.

At the Anthrax benefit, we were the second band on the bill and after the set, the police busted in and raided the place because we were all underage. All the underage people were hiding under the stage for the rest of the night. For a sixteen year old kid, it was probably the most exciting thing to happen. For your band to be playing with all your favorite bands at a big show and now it gets raided by the cops and you got to get home without your parents finding out. You had to get home without your father knowing you borrowed his car. It was a whole new, exciting thing.

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THE NEW YORK CREW INVADES BRAZIL
December 4th, 2014 by Tim

FINAL POSTER

10 QUESTIONS WITH GAVIN VAN VLACK
September 19th, 2014 by Larry

10 Questions with guitarist, Gavin Van Vlack.

PRE-ORDERS ARE OPEN FOR NYHC 1980 – 1990
September 17th, 2014 by Tony
JUST ANOTHER SUNDAY ON THE BOWERY | PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

JUST ANOTHER SUNDAY ON THE BOWERY | PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

Pre-orders are now open on the Bazillion Points website for the book ‘New York Hardcore 1980 – 1990′ by DCXX’s Tony Rettman. All pre-orders will ship December 3rd, 2014 and will come accompanied with an embroidered patch of Sean Taggart artwork as well as a metal badge.

Follow the link below to not only put in your early order, but to check out pictures of proof pages for the book as well as a sneak peak at the chapter, ‘A7 & 2+2 : East Village Nights’.

You can pre-order the book and check out all that stuff right here and be sure to stay tuned to DCXX’s for the raw, uncut interviews conducted for the book along with announcements of book events and whole lot more.

R.I.P. RAYBEEZ
September 11th, 2014 by Larry

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Raymond “Raybeez” Barbieri
11/27/1961 – 09/11/1997

JUDGE AT CITY GARDENS, 6/10/1990
August 23rd, 2014 by Tim

Judge firing on all cylinders, crushing heaviness to a completely packed room, it doesn’t get much better. Although stage diving was still banned at City Gardens, at that point, the energy flowed though that crowd like a high tension wire. Such a great show, one of my personal favorites from the years I went to shows there. – Tim DCXX

JUDGE AT THE DOME, LONDON
August 3rd, 2014 by Tim

GORILLA BISCUITS LIVE AT CITY GARDENS, 11.10.1991
July 27th, 2014 by Ed

NYHC 1980 – 1990 BY DCXX’S TONY RETTMAN DUE OUT IN NOVEMBER
July 24th, 2014 by Tony
REST IN PIECES AT CBGB'S | PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

REST IN PIECES AT CBGB’S | PHOTO: KEN SALERNO

“New York City has an energy that you’re not going to find anywhere else. People who have that passionate, driven mindset; they gravitate to New York City. You couldn’t match it anywhere else. Even being in that intense environment—you had to come into your own to survive that area.”—John Porcelly, Youth of Today/Shelter

Known for its glamorous 1970s punk rock scene, New York City matched the grim urban reality of the 1980s with a rawer musical uprising: New York hardcore. As bands of misfits from across the region gravitated to the forgotten frontier of Manhattan’s Lower East Side. With a a backdrop of despair, bands like Agnostic Front, Cro-Mags, Murphy’s Law, and Youth of Today confronted their reality with relentlessly energetic gigs at CBGB, A7, and the numerous squats in the area.

Tony Rettman’s ambitious oral history captures ten years of struggling, including the scene’s regional rivalries with D.C. and Boston, the birth of moshing, the clash and coming to terms of hardcore and heavy metal, the straightedge movement, and the unlikely influence of Krishna consciousness.

NYHC slams the sidewalk with savage tales of larger-than-life characters and unlikely feats of willpower. The gripping and sometimes hilarious narrative is woven together like the fabric of New York itself from over 100 original interviews with members of Absolution, Adrenalin O.D., Agnostic Front, Antidote, Bad Brains, Bloodclot, Bold, Born Against, Breakdown, Cause for Alarm, Citizen Arrest, Cro-Mags, Crumbsuckers, Death Before Dishonor, Even Worse, False Prophets, Gorilla Biscuits, H20, Heart Attack, Inhuman, Into Another, Irate, Judge, Kraut, Leeway, Life’s Blood, Major Conflict, Murphy’s Law, Nausea, Nihilistics, Nuclear Assault, Numskulls, Outburst, Pro-Pain, Quicksand, Raw Deal, Reagan Youth, Rorschach, S.O.D., Sacrilege, Savage Circle, Sheer Terror, Shelter, Shok, Sick of it All, Side by Side, Skinhead Youth, Straight Ahead, the Abused, the Cryptcrashers, the Mad, the Misfits, the Misguided, the Mob, the Psychos, the Ritz, the Stimulators, the Undead, Token Entry, Underdog, Urban Waste, Virus, Warzone, Youth of Today, and many, many more.

MOSH IT UP!

“In other parts of our neighborhood, guys were breakdancing against each other; we were moshing against each other. It was all about who had the most style, as opposed to today where it’s just picking up change and karate kicking. It was all about trying to keep dancing, while still blasting into someone from D.C. or Boston, and all about who had the hardest pit for their town’s band. It was like supporting your city’s hockey team or something.”—Jimmy G, Murphy’s Law

“At that time, the Lower East Side was a warzone. It wasn’t the gentrified neighborhood that it’s been for the last twenty years. It was a fucking warzone, without question. It was worse than the worse neighborhoods you know in New York City today. It was a trip to be down there and go to those bars and A7 and shit like that. I wasn’t even eighteen yet, and I was getting a peek into a world that most people will never see.”—Eddie Sutton, Leeway

“I had my personal experiences from life; being on the streets, being locked up, and being in abusive foster homes. I was fighting. I was shot and stabbed, and that’s what came out. We sang about street justice and survival on the streets because that shit was for real. That shit was a way to express ourselves and get out that angst. It was real. It wasn’t some hypothetical bullshit.”—John Joseph, Cro-Mags

DOUBLE CROSS will be the exclusive source for info on ‘NYHC 1980 – 1990′ leading up to the books’ release. Expect chapter excerpts, uncut interviews, photos, flyers and much, much more!